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condemn
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

10 uses
  • Yet oft her fraud remember'd he with groans, When by Eurystheus' hard commands he saw Condemn'd to servile tasks his noble son.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (29% in)
  • But when this prodigy befell our rites, Calchas, inspir'd of Heaven, took up his speech: 'Ye long-haired sons of Greece, why stand ye thus In mute amaze? to us Olympian Jove, To whom be endless praise, vouchsafes this sign, Late sent, of late fulfilment: as ye saw The snake devour the sparrow and her young, Eight nestlings, and the parent bird the ninth: So, for so many years, are we condemn'd To wage a fruitless war; but in the tenth The wide-built city shall at last be ours.'
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (37% in)
  • But not the thoughts of Troy's impending fate, Nor Hecuba's nor royal Priam's woes, Nor loss of brethren, numerous and brave, By hostile hands laid prostrate in the dust, So deeply wring my heart as thoughts of thee, Thy days of freedom lost, and led away A weeping captive by some brass-clad Greek; Haply in Argos, at a mistress' beck, Condemn'd to ply the loom, or water draw From Hypereia's or Messeis' fount, Heart-wrung, by stern necessity constrain'd.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (82% in)
  • Oh may I sleep in dust, ere be condemn'd To hear thy cries, and see thee dragg'd away!"
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (83% in)
  • At length the blue-ey'd Goddess, Pallas, said: "O Father, Son of Saturn, King of Kings, Well do we know thy pow'r invincible; Yet deeply grieve we for the warlike Greeks, Condemn'd to hopeless ruin; from the fight, Since such is thy command, we stand aloof; But yet some saving counsel may we give, Lest in thine anger thou destroy them quite."
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (5% in)
  • Well do we know thy pow'r invincible, Yet deeply grieve we for the warlike Greeks, Condemn'd to hopeless ruin: from the fight, Since such is thy command, we stand aloof; But yet some saving counsel may we give, Lest in thine anger thou destroy them quite."
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (79% in)
  • Thy counsels all I utterly condemn; Who, 'mid the close and clamour of the fight, Wouldst have us launch our ships, and give the foe, Already too triumphant, cause renew'd For boasting; then were death our certain lot; For, if the ships he launch'd, not long will Greeks Sustain the war, but with reverted eyes Shrink from the fight; to such pernicious end Would lead thy baneful counsels, mighty chief."
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (18% in)
  • Therefore a suppliant to thy knees I come, If to my son, to early death condemn'd, Thou wilt accord the boon of shield and helm, And well-wrought greaves with silver clasps secur'd, And breastplate; for his own, his faithful friend, By Trojan hands subdued, hath lost; and he, O'erwhelm'd with grief, lies prostrate on the earth."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (71% in)
  • Look too on me with pity; me, on whom, E'en on the threshold of mine age, hath Jove A bitter burthen cast, condemn'd to see My sons struck down, my daughters dragg'd away In servile bonds; our chambers' sanctity Invaded; and our babes by hostile hands Dash'd to the ground; and by ferocious Greeks Enslav'd the widows of my slaughter'd sons.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (11% in)
  • He said; up sprang Oileus' active son, In anger to reply; and farther yet Had gone the quarrel, but Achilles' self Stood up, and thus the rival chiefs address'd: "Forbear, both Ajax and Idomeneus, This bitter interchange of wordy war; It is not seemly; and yourselves, I know, Another would condemn, who so should speak.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (53% in)

There are no more uses of "condemn" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

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