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utmost
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

17 uses
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Definition
greatest
  • To th' utmost of my pow'r Since first we drove the Trojans back, I watch, Unceasing, every chance to ply my shafts.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (50% in)
  • ...Graia, and Mycalessus' wide-spread plains: And who in Harma and Eilesium dwelt, And in Erythrae, and in Eleon, Hyle, and Peteon, and Ocalea, In Copae, and in Medeon's well-built fort, Eutresis, Thisbe's dove-frequented woods, And Coronca, and the grassy meads Of Haliartus; and Plataea's plain, In Glissa, and the foot of Lower Thebes, And in Anchestus, Neptune's sacred grove; And who in viny-cluster'd Arne dwelt, And in Mideia, and the lovely site Of Nissa, and Anthedon's utmost bounds.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (58% in)
  • With all the chiefs he should be busied now, Imploring aid, in this our utmost need.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (19% in)
  • He then makes a great slaughter of the enemy; Ulysses and Diomed put a stop to him for a time; but the latter, being wounded by Paris, is obliged to desert his companion, who is encompassed by the Trojans, wounded, and in the utmost danger, till Menelaus and Ajax rescue him.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (96% in)
  • Close to the gate he stood; and planting firm His foot, to give his arm its utmost pow'r, Full on the middle dash'd the mighty mass.
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (97% in)
  • Juno, seeing the partiality of Jupiter to the Trojans, forms a design to overreach him; she sets off her charms with the utmost care, and (the more surely to enchant him) obtains the magic girdle of Venus.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (99% in)
  • He said; and on his horses' shoulder point Let fall the lash, and loudly through the ranks Call'd on the Trojans; they, with answ'ring shout And noise unspeakable, urg'd on with him Their harness'd steeds; Apollo, in the van, Trod down with ease th' embankment of the ditch, And fill'd it in; and o'er it bridg'd a way Level and wide, far as a jav'lin's flight Hurl'd by an arm that proves its utmost strength.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (47% in)
  • The Trojans, at the sight of Patroclus in Achilles' armour, taking him for that hero, are cast into the utmost consternation: he beats them off from the vessels, Hector himself flies, Sarpedon is killed, though Jupiter was averse to his fate.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (99% in)
  • Welcome the fray; put forth thine utmost speed; Call on the Lycian chiefs, on ev'ry side, To press around, and for Sarpedon fight; Thou too thine arms for my protection wield; For I to thee, through all thy future days, Shall be a ceaseless scandal and reproach, If me, thus slain before the Grecian ships, The Greeks be suffer'd of my arms to spoil: But stand thou fast, and others' courage raise."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (56% in)
  • Back drew great Hector and the chiefs of Troy; Far as a jav'lin's flight, in sportive strife, Or in the deadly battle, hurl'd by one His utmost strength exerting; back so far The Trojans drew, so far the Greeks pursued.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (67% in)
  • Menelaus sends Antilochus to Achilles, with the news of Patroclus's death: then returns to the fight, where, though attacked with the utmost fury, he and Meriones, assisted by the Ajaces, bear off the body to the ships.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (**% in)
  • ...people bids to stretch A huge bull's hide, all drench'd and soak'd with grease; They in a circle rang'd, this way and that, Pull the tough hide, till ent'ring in, the grease Is all absorb'd; and dragg'd by num'rous hands The supple skin to th' utmost length is stretch'd; So these in narrow space this way and that The body dragg'd; and high the hopes of each To bear it off in triumph; to their ships The Greeks, to Troy the Trojans; fiercely rag'd The struggle; spirit-stirring Mars...
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (49% in)
  • ...grease Is all absorb'd; and dragg'd by num'rous hands The supple skin to th' utmost length is stretch'd; So these in narrow space this way and that The body dragg'd; and high the hopes of each To bear it off in triumph; to their ships The Greeks, to Troy the Trojans; fiercely rag'd The struggle; spirit-stirring Mars himself, Or Pallas to her utmost fury rous'd, Had not that struggle with contempt beheld: Such grievous labour o'er Patroclus' corpse Had Jove to horses and to men decreed.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (50% in)
  • ...forth the stalwart youths, th' united strength Of the rous'd village; he unheeding moves At first; but wounded by a jav'lin thrown By some bold youth, he turns, with gaping jaws, And frothing fangs, collecting for the spring, His breast too narrow for his mighty heart; And with his tail he lashes both his flanks And sides, as though to rouse his utmost rage; Then on, in pride of strength, with glaring eyes He dashes, if some hunter he may slay, Or in the foremost rank himself be slain.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (33% in)
  • But when, the farthest limits of the course Attain'd, they turn'd beside the hoary sea, Strain'd to their utmost speed, were plainly seen The qualities of each; then in the front Appear'd Eumelus' flying mares, and next The Trojan horses of Tydides came: Nor these were far behind, but following close They seem'd in act to leap upon the car.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (41% in)
  • Next him, the fair-hair'd Menelaus came, The son of Atreus; but Antilochus Thus to his father's horses call'd aloud: "Forward, and stretch ye to your utmost speed; I ask you not with those of Diomed In vain to strive, whom Pallas hath endued With added swiftness, and his triumph will'd; But haste ye, and o'ertake Atrides' car, Nor be by AEthe, by a mare, disgrac'd.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (44% in)
  • ...Who had by stratagem, and not by speed, O'er Menelaus triumph'd; yet e'en so Atrides' flying coursers press'd him hard; For but so far as from the chariot-wheel A horse, when harness'd to a royal car; Whose tail, back-streaming, with the utmost hairs Brushes the felloes; close before the wheel, Small space between, he scours the wide-spread plain: So far was Menelaus in the rear Of Nestor's son; at first, a discus' cast Between them lay; but rapidly his ground He gain'd—so well the...
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (56% in)

There are no more uses of "utmost" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

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