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ignominious
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

5 uses
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Definition
deserving or bringing disgrace or shame — typically in reference to behavior or character
  • If, from the rest apart, one God I find Presuming or to Trojans or to Greeks To give his aid, with ignominious stripes Back to Olympus shall that God be driv'n; Or to the gloom of Tartarus profound, Far off, the lowest abyss beneath the earth, With, gates of iron, and with floor of brass, Beneath the shades as far as earth from Heav'n, There will I hurl him, and ye all shall know In strength how greatly I surpass you all.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (2% in)
  • Then had the Greeks in shameful flight withdrawn, Had Juno not to Pallas thus appeal'd: "Oh Heav'n! brave child of aegis-bearing Jove, Shall thus the Greeks, in ignominious flight, O'er the wide sea their homeward course pursue, And as a trophy to the sons of Troy The Argive Helen leave, on whose account, Far from their home, so many valiant Greeks Have cast their lives away?
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (18% in)
  • ...standing; he no hand had laid On his dark vessel, for with bitter grief His heart was filled; the blue-ey'd Maid approach'd, And thus address'd him: "Great Laertes' son, Ulysses, sage in council, can it be That you, the men of Greece, embarking thus On your swift ships, in ignominious flight, O'er the wide sea will take your homeward way, And as a trophy to the sons of Troy The Argive Helen leave, on whose account Far from their homes so many valiant Greeks Have cast their lives away?
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (20% in)
  • But this I tell thee, and will make it good, If e'er I find thee play the fool, as now, Then may these shoulders cease this head to bear, And may my son Telemachus no more Own me his father, if I strip not off Thy mantle and thy garments, aye, expose Thy nakedness, and flog thee to the ships Howling, and scourg'd with ignominious stripes."
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (30% in)
  • ...shalt come, No pity will he feel, no rev'rence show: Rather remain we here apart and mourn; For him, when at his birth his thread of life Was spun by fate, 'twas destin'd that afar From home and parents, he should glut the maw Of rav'ning dogs, by that stern warrior's tent, Whose inmost heart I would I could devour: Such for my son were adequate revenge, Whom not in ignominious flight he slew; But standing, thoughtless of escape or flight, For Trojan men and Troy's deep-bosom'd dames."
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (27% in)

There are no more uses of "ignominious" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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