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bane
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

12 uses
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Definition
something that causes misery
  • Or, for that Menelaus in the field Hath vanquish'd Paris, and is willing yet That I, his bane, should to his home return; Here art thou found, to weave again thy wiles!
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (85% in)
  • As when the south wind o'er the mountain tops Spreads a thick veil of mist, the shepherd's bane, And friendly to the nightly thief alone, That a stone's throw the range of vision bounds; So rose the dust-cloud, as in serried ranks With rapid step they mov'd across the plain.
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (2% in)
  • Now when the Trojans Dares' sons beheld, The one in flight, the other stretch'd in death, Their spirits within them quail'd; but Pallas took The hand of Mars, and thus address'd the God: "Mars, Mars, thou bane of mortals, blood-stain'd Lord, Razer of cities, wherefore leave we not The Greeks and Trojans to contend, and see To which the sire of all will vict'ry give; While we retire, and shun the wrath of Jove?"
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (3% in)
  • Mars! thou bane of mortals, blood-stain'd Lord, Razer of cities, wer't not well thyself To interpose, and from the battle-field Withdraw this chief, Tydides? such his pride, He now would dare with Jove himself to fight.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (49% in)
  • As Mars, the bane of men, goes forth to war, Attended by his strong, unfearing son, Terror, who shakes the bravest warrior's soul; They two, from Thrace, against the Ephyri, Or haughty Phlegyans arm; nor hear alike The pray'rs of both the combatants, one side With vict'ry crowning; so to battle went Those leaders twain, in dazzling arms array'd: Then thus Meriones his chief address'd: "Son of Deucalion, say if on the right, Or on the centre of the gen'ral host, Our onset should be...
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (37% in)
  • He Minos, guardian chief of Crete, begot; Noble Deucalion was to Minos born, I to Deucalion; far extends my rule In wide-spread Crete; whom now our ships have brought, A bane to thee, thy sire, and Trojans all.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (54% in)
  • Thy counsels all I utterly condemn; Who, 'mid the close and clamour of the fight, Wouldst have us launch our ships, and give the foe, Already too triumphant, cause renew'd For boasting; then were death our certain lot; For, if the ships he launch'd, not long will Greeks Sustain the war, but with reverted eyes Shrink from the fight; to such pernicious end Would lead thy baneful counsels, mighty chief."
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (19% in)
  • One spear Achilles had, long, pond'rous, tough; But this he touch'd not; none of all the Greeks, None, save Achilles' self, that spear could poise; The far-fam'd Pelian ash, which to his sire, On Pelion's summit fell'd, to be the bane Of mightiest chiefs, the Centaur Chiron gave.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (16% in)
  • So to the shades, by those two brethren's hands Subdued, Sarpedon's comrades brave were sent, The sons of Amisodarus, who rear'd The dread Chimaera, bane of mortal men.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (37% in)
  • Last, from its case he drew his father's spear, Long, pond'rous, tough; not one of all the Greeks, None, save Achilles' self, could poise that spear; The far-fam'd Pelian ash, which to his sire, On Pelion's summit fell'd, to be the bane Of mighty chiefs, the Centaur Chiron gave.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (89% in)
  • She said, and turn'd away her piercing glance: Him, deeply groaning, scarce to life restor'd, Jove's daughter Venus taking by the hand, Led from the field; which when the white-arm'd Queen Beheld, in haste to Pallas thus she cried: "O Heav'n, brave child of aegis-bearing Jove, Undaunted! lo again this saucy jade Amid the press, the bane of mortals, Mars Leads from the field; but haste thee in pursuit."
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (66% in)
  • For he too has a father, like to me; Peleus, by whom he was begot, and bred, The bane of Troy; and, most of all, to me The cause of endless grief, who by his hand Have been of many stalwart sons bereft.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (78% in)

There are no more uses of "bane" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

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