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satiate
used in The Iliad by Homer (translated by: Lang, Leaf, & Myers)

5 uses
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Definition
to satisfy a hunger; or fill to satisfaction (typically said of hunger for food, but can be said of anything desired—such as of knowledge or sensual pleasure)
  • Fearless though he be and insatiate of turmoil, I ween that he shall be fain to rest his knees, if he escape from the fury of war and terrible fray.
    Book 7 (27% in)
  • Thereat trembling gat hold of Achaians and Trojans for fear, so mightily bellowed Ares insatiate of battle.
    Book 5 (93% in)
  • ...beheld them, for against his tower they went, bringing with them ruin; and he looked along the tower of the Achaians if perchance he might see any of the leaders, that would ward off destruction from his comrades, and he beheld the two Aiantes, insatiate of war, standing there, and Teukros hard by, newly come from his hut; but he could not cry to be heard of them, so great was the din, and the noise went up unto heaven of smitten shields and helms with horse-hair crests, and of the...
    Book 12 (71% in)
  • Then he bowed and fell, and Menelaos set his foot on his breast, and stripped him of his arms, and triumphed, saying: "Even thus then surely, ye will leave the ships of the Danaans of the swift steeds, ye Trojans overweening, insatiate of the dread din of war.
    Book 13 (75% in)
  • For verily I fear lest the Achaians repay their debt of yesterday, since by the ships there tarrieth a man insatiate of war, and never, methinks, will he wholly stand aloof from battle.
    Book 13 (89% in)

There are no more uses of "satiate" in The Iliad by Homer (translated by: Lang, Leaf, & Myers).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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