toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

Jane Eyre
used in A Room of One's Own

6 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
famous and still popular novel (by Charlotte Brontë) with unconventional characters including a heroine who transcends her society (1847)
  • And I read how Jane Eyre used to go up on to the roof when Mrs Fairfax was making jellies and looked over the fields at the distant view.
    4 (49% in)
  • But I doubt whether that was true of Charlotte Brontë, I said, opening JANE EYRE and laying it beside PRIDE AND PREJUDICE.
    4 (49% in)
  • But they were not granted; they were withheld; and we must accept the fact that all those good novels, VILLETTE, EMMA, WUTHERING HEIGHTS, MIDDLEMARCH, were written by women without more experience of life than could enter the house of a respectable clergyman; written too in the common sitting-room of that respectable house and by women so poor that they could not afford to buy more than a few quires of paper at a time upon which to write WUTHERING HEIGHTS or JANE EYRE.
    4 (59% in)
  • But how would all this be affected by the sex of the novelist, I wondered, looking at JANE EYRE and the others.
    4 (73% in)
  • Now, in the passages I have quoted from JANE EYRE, it is clear that anger was tampering with the integrity of Charlotte Brontë the novelist.
    4 (73% in)
  • It was about half the length of JANE EYRE.
    5 (13% in)

There are no more uses of "Jane Eyre" in A Room of One's Own.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia ArticleExcerpt from the BookSparkNotes ContentsVideo