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Charles V
used in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

9 uses
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Definition
King of France 1364-1380; recovered much of Western France from England (1338-1380)
  • So Charles V.'s wall suffered the fate of that of Philip Augustus.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (7% in)
  • It was called by three names which explain its history, its destination, and its architecture: "The House of the Dauphin," because Charles V., when Dauphin, had inhabited it; "The Marchandise," because it had served as town hall; and "The Pillared House" (~domus ad piloria~), because of a series of large pillars which sustained the three stories.
    1.2.2 — Vol 1 Bk 2 Chpt 2 — The Place de Greve (45% in)
  • Beginning with 1367, the city spreads to such an extent into the suburbs, that a new wall becomes necessary, particularly on the right bank; Charles V. builds it.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (6% in)
  • The culminating point of the Town wall (that of Charles V.) was at the gates of Saint-Denis and Saint-Martin, whose situation has not been changed.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (12% in)
  • The Town had six gates, built by Charles V.; beginning with the Tour de Billy they were: the Porte Saint-Antoine, the Porte du Temple, the Porte Saint-Martin, the Porte Saint-Denis, the Porte Montmartre, the Porte Saint-Honoré.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (17% in)
  • One could there distinguish, very well, though cleverly united with the principal building by long galleries, decked with painted glass and slender columns, the three Hôtels which Charles V. had amalgamated with his palace: the Hôtel du Petit-Muce, with the airy balustrade, which formed a graceful border to its roof; the Hôtel of the Abbe de Saint-Maur, having the vanity of a stronghold, a great tower, machicolations, loopholes, iron gratings, and over the large Saxon door, the...
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (52% in)
  • ...on the left, the house of the Provost of Paris, flanked by four small towers, delicately grooved, in the middle; at the extremity, the Hôtel Saint-Pol, properly speaking, with its multiplied facades, its successive enrichments from the time of Charles V., the hybrid excrescences, with which the fancy of the architects had loaded it during the last two centuries, with all the apses of its chapels, all the gables of its galleries, a thousand weathercocks for the four winds, and its two...
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (54% in)
  • Beyond the Tournelles, as far as the wall of Charles V., spread out, with rich compartments of verdure and of flowers, a velvet carpet of cultivated land and royal parks, in the midst of which one recognized, by its labyrinth of trees and alleys, the famous Daedalus garden which Louis XI. had given to Coictier.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (59% in)
  • As we have just said, the quarter of the palace, of which we have just endeavored to give the reader some idea by indicating only the chief points, filled the angle which Charles V.'s wall made with the Seine on the east.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (60% in)

There are no more uses of "Charles V" in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

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