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thus
used in The House of the Seven Gables

59 uses
  • While thus criminally occupied, he was startled by the opening of the chamber-door.
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (23% in)
  • The author has considered it hardly worth his while, therefore, relentlessly to impale the story with its moral as with an iron rod,—or, rather, as by sticking a pin through a butterfly,—thus at once depriving it of life, and causing it to stiffen in an ungainly and unnatural attitude.
    Preface (62% in)
  • His home would include the home of the dead and buried wizard, and would thus afford the ghost of the latter a kind of privilege to haunt its new apartments, and the chambers into which future bridegrooms were to lead their brides, and where children of the Pyncheon blood were to be born.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (16% in)
  • Not improbably he was the best workman of his time; or, perhaps, the Colonel thought it expedient, or was impelled by some better feeling, thus openly to cast aside all animosity against the race of his fallen antagonist.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (21% in)
  • Thus the great house was built.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (22% in)
  • Thus early had that one guest,—the only guest who is certain, at one time or another, to find his way into every human dwelling,—thus early had Death stepped across the threshold of the House of the Seven Gables!
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (44% in)
  • Thus early had that one guest,—the only guest who is certain, at one time or another, to find his way into every human dwelling,—thus early had Death stepped across the threshold of the House of the Seven Gables!
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (44% in)
  • Thus the Maules, at all events, kept their resentments within their own breasts.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (83% in)
  • This little bell,—to speak in plainer terms,—being fastened over the shop-door, was so contrived as to vibrate by means of a steel spring, and thus convey notice to the inner regions of the house when any customer should cross the threshold.
    Chapter 3 — The First Customer (3% in)
  • Thus did Hepzibah bewilder herself with these fantasies of the old time.
    Chapter 4 — A Day Behind the Counter (25% in)
  • Thus Uncle Venner was a miscellaneous old gentleman, partly himself, but, in good measure, somebody else; patched together, too, of different epochs; an epitome of times and fashions.
    Chapter 4 — A Day Behind the Counter (43% in)
  • Thus, all the while Hepzibah was perfecting the scheme of her little shop, she had cherished an unacknowledged idea that some harlequin trick of fortune would intervene in her favor.
    Chapter 4 — A Day Behind the Counter (62% in)
  • There is sad confusion, indeed, when the spirit thus flits away into the past, or into the more awful future, or, in any manner, steps across the spaceless boundary betwixt its own region and the actual world; where the body remains to guide itself as best it may, with little more than the mechanism of animal life.
    Chapter 4 — A Day Behind the Counter (78% in)
  • ...business, committing the most unheard-of errors: now stringing up twelve, and now seven, tallow-candles, instead of ten to the pound; selling ginger for Scotch snuff, pins for needles, and needles for pins; misreckoning her change, sometimes to the public detriment, and much oftener to her own; and thus she went on, doing her utmost to bring chaos back again, until, at the close of the day's labor, to her inexplicable astonishment, she found the money-drawer almost destitute of coin.
    Chapter 4 — A Day Behind the Counter (81% in)
  • Thus, Hepzibah was well content to acknowledge Phoebe's vastly superior gifts as a shop-keeper'—she listened, with compliant ear, to her suggestion of various methods whereby the influx of trade might be increased, and rendered profitable, without a hazardous outlay of capital.
    Chapter 5 — May and November (61% in)
  • Thus it was for the interest of all New England that the Pyncheons should have justice done them.
    Chapter 5 — May and November (87% in)
  • While thus dismissing her, the maiden lady stept forward, kissed Phoebe, and pressed her to her heart, which beat against the girl's bosom with a strong, high, and tumultuous swell.
    Chapter 6 — Maule's Well (96% in)
  • How came there to be so much love in this desolate old heart, that it could afford to well over thus abundantly?
    Chapter 6 — Maule's Well (97% in)
  • Thus murmuring in an undertone, as if speaking rather to her own heart than to Phoebe, the old gentlewoman stepped on tiptoe about the room, making such arrangements as suggested themselves at the crisis.
    Chapter 7 — The Guest (30% in)
  • This remarkable urchin, in truth, was the very emblem of old Father Time, both in respect of his all-devouring appetite for men and things, and because he, as well as Time, after ingulfing thus much of creation, looked almost as youthful as if he had been just that moment made.
    Chapter 8 — The Pyncheon of To-day (3% in)
  • Thus it happened, that when Phoebe heard a certain noise in Judge Pyncheon's throat,—rather habitual with him, not altogether voluntary, yet indicative of nothing, unless it were a slight bronchial complaint, or, as some people hinted, an apoplectic symptom,—when the girl heard this queer and awkward ingurgitation (which the writer never did hear, and therefore cannot describe), she very foolishly started, and clasped her hands.
    Chapter 8 — The Pyncheon of To-day (55% in)
  • Or else,—and it was quite as probably the case,—she had been enriched by poverty, developed by sorrow, elevated by the strong and solitary affection of her life, and thus endowed with heroism, which never could have characterized her in what are called happier circumstances.
    Chapter 9 — Clifford and Phoebe (1% in)
  • Thus, his sentiment for Phoebe, without being paternal, was not less chaste than if she had been his daughter.
    Chapter 9 — Clifford and Phoebe (72% in)
  • Was he always thus?
    Chapter 9 — Clifford and Phoebe (92% in)
  • She said that it had always been thus with Clifford when the humming-birds came,—always, from his babyhood,—and that his delight in them had been one of the earliest tokens by which he showed his love for beautiful things.
    Chapter 10 — The Pyncheon Garden (28% in)
  • ...it may be, in the mirror of his deeper consciousness, that he was an example and representative of that great class of people whom an inexplicable Providence is continually putting at cross-purposes with the world: breaking what seems its own promise in their nature; withholding their proper food, and setting poison before them for a banquet; and thus—when it might so easily, as one would think, have been adjusted otherwise—making their existence a strangeness, a solitude, and torment.
    Chapter 10 — The Pyncheon Garden (35% in)
  • Thus unscrupulously did the old gentlewoman sacrifice the continuance, perhaps, of an ancient feathered race, with no better end than to supply her brother with a dainty that hardly filled the bowl of a tea-spoon!
    Chapter 10 — The Pyncheon Garden (62% in)
  • A cab; an omnibus, with its populous interior, dropping here and there a passenger, and picking up another, and thus typifying that vast rolling vehicle, the world, the end of whose journey is everywhere and nowhere; these objects he followed eagerly with his eyes, but forgot them before the dust raised by the horses and wheels had settled along their track.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (8% in)
  • The idea of terrible energy thus forced upon him was new at every recurrence, and seemed to affect him as disagreeably, and with almost as much surprise, the hundredth time as the first.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (13% in)
  • Thus, lingering always so near his childhood, he had sympathies with children, and kept his heart the fresher thereby, like a reservoir into which rivulets were pouring not far from the fountain-head.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (89% in)
  • And while he thus slept early, as other children do, and dreamed of childhood, Phoebe was free to follow her own tastes for the remainder of the day and evening.
    Chapter 12 — The Daguerreotypist (6% in)
  • This enthusiasm, infusing itself through the calmness of his character, and thus taking an aspect of settled thought and wisdom, would serve to keep his youth pure, and make his aspirations high.
    Chapter 12 — The Daguerreotypist (53% in)
  • Thus the artist, whatever he might judge of Phoebe's capacity, was beguiled, by some silent charm of hers, to talk freely of what he dreamed of doing in the world.
    Chapter 12 — The Daguerreotypist (67% in)
  • Here ensued a great many words between Matthew Maule and the proprietor of the Seven Gables, on the subject which the latter had thus broached.
    Chapter 13 — Alice Pyncheon (38% in)
  • By what unhappy impulse did she thus put herself at once on terms of defiance against a strength which she could not estimate?
    Chapter 13 — Alice Pyncheon (68% in)
  • It troubles me to see you thus!
    Chapter 13 — Alice Pyncheon (78% in)
  • Thus all the dignity of life was lost.
    Chapter 13 — Alice Pyncheon (96% in)
  • Thus parted the old man and the rosy girl; and Phoebe took the wings of the morning, and was soon flitting almost as rapidly away as if endowed with the aerial locomotion of the angels to whom Uncle Venner had so graciously compared her.
    Chapter 14 — Phoebe's Good-Bye (99% in)
  • Why insulate him thus from all sympathy and kindness?
    Chapter 15 — The Scowl and Smile (21% in)
  • A hard, cold man, thus unfortunately situated, seldom or never looking inward, and resolutely taking his idea of himself from what purports to be his image as reflected in the mirror of public opinion, can scarcely arrive at true self-knowledge, except through loss of property and reputation.
    Chapter 15 — The Scowl and Smile (56% in)
  • Surely, it must have been at no slight cost that he had thus fortified his soul with iron.
    Chapter 15 — The Scowl and Smile (97% in)
  • Thus it is that the grief of the passing moment takes upon itself an individuality, and a character of climax, which it is destined to lose after a while, and to fade into the dark gray tissue common to the grave or glad events of many years ago.
    Chapter 16 — Clifford's Chamber (6% in)
  • Instinctively she paused before the arched window, and looked out upon the street, in order to seize its permanent objects with her mental grasp, and thus to steady herself from the reel and vibration which affected her more immediate sphere.
    Chapter 16 — Clifford's Chamber (9% in)
  • Thus, as the Judge required an impossibility of Clifford, the latter, as he could not perform it, must needs perish.
    Chapter 16 — Clifford's Chamber (22% in)
  • Her faith was too weak; the prayer too heavy to be thus uplifted.
    Chapter 16 — Clifford's Chamber (43% in)
  • Thus Judge Pyncheon's fiendish scheme would be ready accomplished to his hands!
    Chapter 16 — Clifford's Chamber (66% in)
  • Thus, she was fain to shrink deeper into herself, as it were, as if in the hope of making people suppose that here was only a cloak and hood, threadbare and woefully faded, taking an airing in the midst of the storm, without any wearer!
    Chapter 17 — The Flight of Two Owls (16% in)
  • Thus it happened that the relation heretofore existing between her brother and herself was changed.
    Chapter 17 — The Flight of Two Owls (40% in)
  • He lays his own dead corpse beneath the underpinning, as one may say, and hangs his frowning picture on the wall, and, after thus converting himself into an evil destiny, expects his remotest great-grandchildren to be happy there.
    Chapter 17 — The Flight of Two Owls (74% in)
  • Or, to an absent husband, should come tidings thus 'An immortal being, of whom you are the father, has this moment come from God!' and immediately its little voice would seem to have reached so far, and to be echoing in his heart.
    Chapter 17 — The Flight of Two Owls (85% in)
  • A veteran politician, such as he, would never fall asleep with wide-open eyes, lest some enemy or mischief-maker, taking him thus at unawares, should peep through these windows into his consciousness, and make strange discoveries among the reminiscences, projects, hopes, apprehensions, weaknesses, and strong points, which he has heretofore shared with nobody.
    Chapter 18 — Governor Pyncheon (5% in)
  • It is odd, however, that a gentleman so burdened with engagements,—and noted, too, for punctuality,—should linger thus in an old lonely mansion, which he has never seemed very fond of visiting.
    Chapter 18 — Governor Pyncheon (7% in)
  • The purpose of his brain has been kept sacred thus long after the man himself has sprouted up in graveyard grass.
    Chapter 18 — Governor Pyncheon (72% in)
  • Before her eyes had adapted themselves to the obscurity, a hand grasped her own with a firm but gentle and warm pressure, thus imparting a welcome which caused her heart to leap and thrill with an indefinable shiver of enjoyment.
    Chapter 20 — The Flower of Eden (2% in)
  • Yet the artist did not feel the horror, which was proper to Phoebe's sweet and order-loving character, at thus finding herself at issue with society, and brought in contact with an event that transcended ordinary rules.
    Chapter 20 — The Flower of Eden (56% in)
  • Thus Jaffrey Pyncheon's inward criminality, as regarded Clifford, was, indeed, black and damnable; while its mere outward show and positive commission was the smallest that could possibly consist with so great a sin.
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (33% in)
  • Then, every generation of the family might have altered the interior, to suit its own taste and convenience; while the exterior, through the lapse of years, might have been adding venerableness to its original beauty, and thus giving that impression of permanence which I consider essential to the happiness of any one moment.
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (57% in)
  • A recess in the wall was thus brought to light, in which lay an object so covered with a century's dust that it could not immediately be recognized as a folded sheet of parchment.
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (67% in)
  • Thus they bartered their eastern territory for Maule's garden-ground."
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (76% in)

There are no more uses of "thus" in The House of the Seven Gables.

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