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purge
used in For Whom the Bell Tolls

5 uses
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Definition
get rid of things thought undesirable
The exact meaning of purge can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "purge the government of our enemies" — get rid of people for political reasons
  • "purge my closet of everything I haven't worn in a year" — get rid of undesired things
  • "To purge yourself of crippling sorrow, you'll need to express it." — get rid of unwanted feelings
  • "I'm doing a 24-hour purge and then starting a new diet." — emptying the intestinal tract
  • You learned the dry-mouthed, fear-purged, purging ecstasy of battle and you fought that summer and that fall for all the poor in the world, against all tyranny, for all the things that you believed and for the new world you had been educated into.
    Chapter 18 (50% in)
  • You learned the dry-mouthed, fear-purged, purging ecstasy of battle and you fought that summer and that fall for all the poor in the world, against all tyranny, for all the things that you believed and for the new world you had been educated into.
    Chapter 18 (50% in)
  • " 'Purge' is the word you want," the officer said, still not looking up.
    Chapter 40 (44% in)
  • Here it reports the purging of more of thy famous Russians.
    Chapter 40 (45% in)
  • They are purging more than the epsom salts in this epoch.
    Chapter 40 (45% in)

There are no more uses of "purge" in For Whom the Bell Tolls.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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