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monastery
used in The Brothers Karamazov

140 uses
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Definition
the residence of a religious community
  • One paper had even stated that he had gone into a monastery and become a monk, in horror at his brother's crime.
    Book 11 — Ivan (12% in)
monastery = the residence of a religious community
  • His splendid estate lay on the outskirts of our little town and bordered on the lands of our famous monastery, with which Pyotr Alexandrovitch began an endless lawsuit, almost as soon as he came into the estate, concerning the rights of fishing in the river or wood-cutting in the forest, I don't know exactly which.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (14% in)
  • I mention this incident particularly because this article penetrated into the famous monastery in our neighborhood, where the inmates, being particularly interested in the question of the ecclesiastical courts, were completely bewildered by it.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (37% in)
  • Yes, he had been for the last year in our monastery, and seemed willing to be cloistered there for the rest of his life.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (43% in)
  • He was simply an early lover of humanity, and that he adopted the monastic life was simply because at that time it struck him, so to say, as the ideal escape for his soul struggling from the darkness of worldly wickedness to the light of love.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (43% in)
  • He suddenly took a thousand roubles to our monastery to pay for requiems for the soul of his wife; but not for the second, Alyosha's mother, the "crazy woman," but for the first, Adelaida Ivanovna, who used to thrash him.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (62% in)
  • Not long after visiting his mother's grave Alyosha suddenly announced that he wanted to enter the monastery, and that the monks were willing to receive him as a novice.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (64% in)
  • The old man knew that the elder Zossima, who was living in the monastery hermitage, had made a special impression upon his "gentle boy."
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (65% in)
  • ... Do you know that near one monastery there's a place outside the town where every baby knows there are none but 'the monks' wives' living, as they are called.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (66% in)
  • The monks in the monastery probably believe that there's a ceiling in hell, for instance.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (68% in)
  • Oh! no doubt, in the monastery he fully believed in miracles, but, to my thinking, miracles are never a stumbling-block to the realist.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (72% in)
  • Perhaps his memories of childhood brought back our monastery, to which his mother may have taken him to mass.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (76% in)
  • Brooding on these things he may have come to us perhaps only to see whether here he could sacrifice all or only "two roubles," and in the monastery he met this elder.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (77% in)
  • I must digress to explain what an "elder" is in Russian monasteries, and I am sorry that I do not feel very competent to do so.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (77% in)
  • Authorities on the subject assert that the institution of "elders" is of recent date, not more than a hundred years old in our monasteries, though in the orthodox East, especially in Sinai and Athos, it has existed over a thousand years.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (77% in)
  • But to this day it exists in few monasteries only, and has sometimes been almost persecuted as an innovation in Russia.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (78% in)
  • It flourished especially in the celebrated Kozelski Optin Monastery.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (78% in)
  • When and how it was introduced into our monastery I cannot say.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (78% in)
  • The question for our monastery was an important one, for it had not been distinguished by anything in particular till then: they had neither relics of saints, nor wonder-working ikons, nor glorious traditions, nor historical exploits.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (79% in)
  • The obligations due to an elder are not the ordinary "obedience" which has always existed in our Russian monasteries.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (80% in)
  • The story is told, for instance, that in the early days of Christianity one such novice, failing to fulfill some command laid upon him by his elder, left his monastery in Syria and went to Egypt.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (81% in)
  • That is why in many of our monasteries the institution was at first resisted almost to persecution.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (83% in)
  • Masses of the ignorant people as well as men of distinction flocked, for instance, to the elders of our monastery to confess their doubts, their sins, and their sufferings, and ask for counsel and admonition.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (83% in)
  • In the end, however, the institution of elders has been retained and is becoming established in Russian monasteries.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (84% in)
  • Though he wore the monastic dress it was voluntarily, not to be different from others.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (85% in)
  • There were, no doubt, up to the end of his life, among the monks some who hated and envied him, but they were few in number and they were silent, though among them were some of great dignity in the monastery, one, for instance, of the older monks distinguished for his strict keeping of fasts and vows of silence.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (87% in)
  • Some were almost fanatically devoted to him, and declared, though not quite aloud, that he was a saint, that there could be no doubt of it, and, seeing that his end was near, they anticipated miracles and great glory to the monastery in the immediate future from his relics.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (87% in)
  • The conviction that after his death the elder would bring extraordinary glory to the monastery was even stronger in Alyosha than in any one there, and, of late, a kind of deep flame of inner ecstasy burnt more and more strongly in his heart.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (91% in)
  • He was suddenly seized with the desire to see the monastery and the holy man.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (97% in)
  • As his lawsuit with the monastery still dragged on, he made it the pretext for seeing the Superior, in order to attempt to settle it amicably.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (97% in)
  • Influences from within the monastery were brought to bear on the elder, who of late had scarcely left his cell, and had been forced by illness to deny even his ordinary visitors.
    Book 1 — The History Of A Family (97% in)
  • An Unfortunate Gathering Chapter I. They Arrive At The Monastery It was a warm, bright day at the end of August.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (0% in)
  • The visitors left their carriage at the hotel, outside the precincts, and went to the gates of the monastery on foot.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (1% in)
  • Except Fyodor Pavlovitch, none of the party had ever seen the monastery, and Miuesov had probably not even been to church for thirty years.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (1% in)
  • But, except the church and the domestic buildings, though these too were ordinary enough, he found nothing of interest in the interior of the monastery.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (1% in)
  • It was strange that their arrival did not seem expected, and that they were not received with special honor, though one of them had recently made a donation of a thousand roubles, while another was a very wealthy and highly cultured landowner, upon whom all in the monastery were in a sense dependent, as a decision of the lawsuit might at any moment put their fishing rights in his hands.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (2% in)
  • Father Zossima lives in the hermitage, apart, four hundred paces from the monastery, the other side of the copse.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (3% in)
  • The honor and glory of the monastery, Zossima.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (3% in)
  • Miuesov observed aloud, while Maximov ran back to the monastery.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (4% in)
  • He was a divinity student, living under the protection of the monastery.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (7% in)
  • He alone in the monastery knew Rakitin's thoughts.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (14% in)
  • The mother was sitting on a chair by the side of her daughter's invalid carriage, and two paces from her stood an old monk, not one of our monastery, but a visitor from an obscure religious house in the far north.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (21% in)
  • I do not know how it may be now, but in my childhood I often happened to see and hear these "possessed" women in the villages and monasteries.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (22% in)
  • She came from a village only six versts from the monastery, and had been brought to him before.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (24% in)
  • I have been in three monasteries, but they told me, 'Go, Nastasya, go to them'—that is to you.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (25% in)
  • He announced that he had come from the far north, from Obdorsk, from Saint Sylvester, and was a member of a poor monastery, consisting of only ten monks.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (35% in)
  • After such an escapade how can I go to dinner, to gobble up the monastery's sauces?
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (72% in)
  • When it is God's will to call me, leave the monastery.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (74% in)
  • As he hastened out of the hermitage precincts to reach the monastery in time to serve at the Father Superior's dinner, he felt a sudden pang at his heart, and stopped short.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (75% in)
  • He had told him not to weep, and to leave the monastery.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (75% in)
  • He hurried through the copse that divided the monastery from the hermitage, and unable to bear the burden of his thoughts, he gazed at the ancient pines beside the path.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (75% in)
  • He determined to drop his litigation with the monastery, and relinquish his claims to the wood-cutting and fishery rights at once.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (87% in)
  • The cloth was clean, the service shone; there were three kinds of well-baked bread, two bottles of wine, two of excellent mead, and a large glass jug of kvas—both the latter made in the monastery, and famous in the neighborhood.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (88% in)
  • Rakitin, of course, was a person of too little consequence to be invited to the dinner, to which Father Iosif, Father Paissy, and one other monk were the only inmates of the monastery invited.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (89% in)
  • He told the coachman to wait, while with rapid steps he returned to the monastery and straight to the Father Superior's.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (91% in)
  • There had been at one time malicious rumors which had even reached the Archbishop (not only regarding our monastery, but in others where the institution of elders existed) that too much respect was paid to the elders, even to the detriment of the authority of the Superior, that the elders abused the sacrament of confession and so on and so on—absurd charges which had died away of themselves everywhere.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (95% in)
  • No, saintly monk, you try being virtuous in the world, do good to society, without shutting yourself up in a monastery at other people's expense, and without expecting a reward up aloft for it—you'll find that a bit harder.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (96% in)
  • This monastery has played a great part in my life!
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (97% in)
  • It must be noted again that our monastery never had played any great part in his life, and he never had shed a bitter tear owing to it.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (97% in)
  • After a pause of two minutes, looking askance at his son, "Why, it was you got up all this monastery business.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (**% in)
  • But I shall take Alyosha away from the monastery, though you will dislike it so much, most honored Karl von Moor.
    Book 2 — An Unfortunate Gathering (**% in)
  • Alyosha knew that his father would let him go back to the monastery next day, possibly even that evening.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (13% in)
  • Though he knew little of women, he had spent his life, from early childhood till he entered the monastery, entirely with women.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (14% in)
  • Sipping his brandy and listening to the story, he observed that they ought to make a saint of a soldier like that, and to take his skin to some monastery.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (52% in)
  • "Well, your monastery may stand then, Alyosha, if that's how it is.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (61% in)
  • I took her to the monastery then to bring her to her senses.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (67% in)
  • And I'll let you go back to the monastery....
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (73% in)
  • Alyosha told Ivan that their father had waked up, was conscious, and had let him go back to sleep at the monastery.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (74% in)
  • Another Reputation Ruined It was not much more than three-quarters of a mile from the town to the monastery.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (90% in)
  • At last I thought of waiting here, for you had to pass here, there's no other way to the monastery.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (90% in)
  • Alyosha went towards the monastery.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (95% in)
  • —— He went round the monastery, and crossed the pine-wood to the hermitage.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (95% in)
  • Yet the older and more experienced of the monks adhered to their opinion, arguing that "for those who have come within these walls sincerely seeking salvation, such obedience and sacrifice will certainly be salutary and of great benefit; those, on the other hand, who find it irksome, and repine, are no true monks, and have made a mistake in entering the monastery—their proper place is in the world.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (97% in)
  • Alyosha firmly and ardently resolved that in spite of his promises to his father, the Hohlakovs, and Katerina Ivanovna, he would not leave the monastery next day, but would remain with his elder to the end.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (97% in)
  • His heart glowed with love, and he reproached himself bitterly for having been able for one instant to forget him whom he had left in the monastery on his deathbed, and whom he honored above every one in the world.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (98% in)
  • Of course, on condition that you will leave the monastery.
    Book 3 — The Sensualists (99% in)
  • People began coming from the monastery.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (1% in)
  • Within the hour the "miracle" was of course known to the whole monastery, and many visitors who had come for the mass.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (7% in)
  • No one seemed more impressed by it than the monk who had come the day before from St. Sylvester, from the little monastery of Obdorsk in the far North.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (7% in)
  • He was seventy-five or more, and he lived in a corner beyond the apiary in an old decaying wooden cell which had been built long ago for another great ascetic, Father Iona, who had lived to be a hundred and five, and of whose saintly doings many curious stories were still extant in the monastery and the neighborhood.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (8% in)
  • It was simply a peasant's hut, though it looked like a chapel, for it contained an extraordinary number of ikons with lamps perpetually burning before them—which men brought to the monastery as offerings to God.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (8% in)
  • "From the little Obdorsk monastery, from St. Sylvester," the monk answered humbly, whilst his keen and inquisitive, but rather frightened little eyes kept watch on the hermit.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (11% in)
  • Besides he had, before visiting the monastery, a strong prejudice against the institution of "elders," which he only knew of by hearsay and believed to be a pernicious innovation.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (15% in)
  • Before he had been long at the monastery, he had detected the secret murmurings of some shallow brothers who disliked the institution.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (15% in)
  • As Alyosha left the monastery and thought them over, he suddenly realized that he had met a new and unexpected friend, a warmly loving teacher, in this austere monk who had hitherto treated him sternly.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (18% in)
  • "To-day I can't possibly, for I am going back to the monastery and I shan't come and see you for the next two days—three or four perhaps—for Father Zossima—"
    Book 4 — Lacerations (42% in)
  • As soon as I read it, I thought that all that would come to pass, for as soon as Father Zossima dies, I am to leave the monastery.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (42% in)
  • But I should like to see Katerina Ivanovna at once, for I am very anxious to be back at the monastery as soon as I can.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (45% in)
  • Alexey Fyodorovitch, don't trouble to come and see me afterwards, but go straight back to your monastery and a good riddance.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (45% in)
  • Time was passing: the thought of his dying elder had not left Alyosha for one minute from the time he set off from the monastery.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (67% in)
  • "It's a monk come to beg for the monastery.
    Book 4 — Lacerations (72% in)
  • I shall be leaving the monastery altogether in a few days.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (8% in)
  • What will you wear when you come out of the monastery?
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (9% in)
  • Alyosha's whole soul turned to the monastery, to his dying saint, but the necessity of seeing Dmitri outweighed everything.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (14% in)
  • Alyosha did not, however, give much thought to the details of his plan, but resolved to act upon it, even if it meant not getting back to the monastery that day.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (14% in)
  • It was impossible for him to go into the tavern in his monastic dress, but he could inquire at the entrance for his brothers and call them down.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (21% in)
  • Is it true that you mean to leave the monastery?
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (25% in)
  • Not to speak of Dante, in France, clerks, as well as the monks in the monasteries, used to give regular performances in which the Madonna, the saints, the angels, Christ, and God himself were brought on the stage.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (48% in)
  • In our monasteries the monks busied themselves in translating, copying, and even composing such poems—and even under the Tatars.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (49% in)
  • But all at once he turned too, and almost ran to the monastery.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (76% in)
  • Several times afterwards he wondered how he could on leaving Ivan so completely forget his brother Dmitri, though he had that morning, only a few hours before, so firmly resolved to find him and not to give up doing so, even should he be unable to return to the monastery that night.
    Book 5 — Pro And Contra (76% in)
  • That was very long ago, forty years before, when Father Zossima first began his life as a monk in a poor and little monastery at Kostroma, and when, shortly after, he had accompanied Father Anfim on his pilgrimage to collect alms for their poor monastery.
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (2% in)
  • That was very long ago, forty years before, when Father Zossima first began his life as a monk in a poor and little monastery at Kostroma, and when, shortly after, he had accompanied Father Anfim on his pilgrimage to collect alms for their poor monastery.
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (2% in)
  • In my youth, long ago, nearly forty years ago, I traveled all over Russia with Father Anfim, collecting funds for our monastery, and we stayed one night on the bank of a great navigable river with some fishermen.
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (27% in)
  • I have sent in my papers this morning and as soon as I get my discharge I shall go into a monastery—it's with that object I am leaving the regiment."
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (41% in)
  • The monastic way is very different.
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (75% in)
  • The monk is reproached for his solitude, "You have secluded yourself within the walls of the monastery for your own salvation, and have forgotten the brotherly service of humanity!"
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (75% in)
  • "I gave it to the monastery," I answered; "we live in common."
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (81% in)
  • After tea I began saying good-by, and suddenly he brought out half a rouble as an offering to the monastery, and another half-rouble I saw him thrusting hurriedly into my hand: "That's for you in your wanderings, it may be of use to you, Father."
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (81% in)
  • The news of his death spread at once through the hermitage and reached the monastery.
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (99% in)
  • By the morning all the town was talking of the event, and crowds were flocking from the town to the monastery.
    Book 6 — The Russian Monk (**% in)
  • All this was done by Father Paissy, who then clothed the deceased in his monastic garb and wrapped him in his cloak, which was, according to custom, somewhat slit to allow of its being folded about him in the form of a cross.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (1% in)
  • Father Paissy desired later on to read the Gospel all day and night over his dead friend, but for the present he, as well as the Father Superintendent of the Hermitage, was very busy and occupied, for something extraordinary, an unheard-of, even "unseemly" excitement and impatient expectation began to be apparent in the monks, and the visitors from the monastery hostels, and the crowds of people flocking from the town.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (2% in)
  • In the crowd in the dead man's cell he noticed with inward aversion (for which he immediately reproached himself) the presence of Rakitin and of the monk from Obdorsk, who was still staying in the monastery.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (4% in)
  • Meanwhile the time was passing; the monastery services and the requiems for the dead followed in their due course.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (7% in)
  • But by three o'clock those signs had become so clear and unmistakable, that the news swiftly reached all the monks and visitors in the hermitage, promptly penetrated to the monastery, throwing all the monks into amazement, and finally, in the shortest possible time, spread to the town, exciting every one in it, believers and unbelievers alike.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (9% in)
  • In all the past history of our monastery, no such scandal could be recalled, and in no other circumstances could such a scandal have been possible, as showed itself in unseemly disorder immediately after this discovery among the very monks themselves.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (9% in)
  • Of course there had been, in former times, saints in the monastery whose memory was carefully preserved and whose relics, according to tradition, showed no signs of corruption.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (10% in)
  • Another memory cherished in the monastery was that of the famous Father Varsonofy, who was only recently dead and had preceded Father Zossima in the eldership.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (11% in)
  • He was reverenced during his lifetime as a crazy saint by all the pilgrims to the monastery.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (11% in)
  • For though the late elder had won over many hearts, more by love than by miracles, and had gathered round him a mass of loving adherents, none the less, in fact, rather the more on that account he had awakened jealousy and so had come to have bitter enemies, secret and open, not only in the monastery but in the world outside it.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (12% in)
  • Why, every one in the monastery cherished the same thought and the same hope, even those whose intellects Alyosha revered, Father Paissy himself, for instance.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (34% in)
  • And a whole year of life in the monastery had formed the habit of this expectation in his heart.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (35% in)
  • It had begun to get dusk when Rakitin, crossing the pine copse from the hermitage to the monastery, suddenly noticed Alyosha, lying face downwards on the ground under a tree, not moving and apparently asleep.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (37% in)
  • "Listen!" he said aloud, "let's go by the path beyond the monastery straight to the town.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (42% in)
  • "It's time we were off," he said, "it's late, we shall be shut out of the monastery."
    Book 7 — Alyosha (83% in)
  • Alyosha came out of the town and walked across the fields to the monastery.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (88% in)
  • Cana Of Galilee It was very late, according to the monastery ideas, when Alyosha returned to the hermitage; the door-keeper let him in by a special entrance.
    Book 7 — Alyosha (88% in)
  • Within three days he left the monastery in accordance with the words of his elder, who had bidden him "sojourn in the world."
    Book 7 — Alyosha (**% in)
  • He's been on a pilgrimage, so he says, to the monastery in the town.
    Book 8 — Mitya (64% in)
  • I have heard you are a mystic and have been in the monastery.
    Book 10 — The Boys (81% in)
  • Another contradicted this, and stated that he and his elder, Father Zossima, had broken into the monastery chest and "made tracks from the monastery."
    Book 11 — Ivan (12% in)
  • Another contradicted this, and stated that he and his elder, Father Zossima, had broken into the monastery chest and "made tracks from the monastery."
    Book 11 — Ivan (12% in)
  • He used to come and see him in the monastery and discussed for hours together with him and with the monks.
    Book 11 — Ivan (26% in)
  • It was the letter written by Mitya to Katerina Ivanovna when he was drunk, on the very evening he met Alyosha at the crossroads on the way to the monastery, after the scene at Katerina Ivanovna's, when Grushenka had insulted her.
    Book 11 — Ivan (59% in)
  • It has come to my knowledge that Madame Svyetlov was particularly anxious a couple of months ago to make the acquaintance of the younger Karamazov, Alexey Fyodorovitch, and promised you twenty-five roubles, if you would bring him to her in his monastic dress.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (12% in)
  • And, obviously only now for the first time struck by an idea, he recounted eagerly how, at his last interview with Mitya that evening under the tree, on the road to the monastery, Mitya had struck himself on the breast, "the upper part of the breast," and had repeated several times that he had a means of regaining his honor, that that means was here, here on his breast.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (22% in)
  • This fact was a complete surprise to every one; no one in the town nor in the monastery, not even Mitya, knew of it.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (28% in)
  • He clung to the monastery, and was within an ace of becoming a monk.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (42% in)
  • Here the prosecutor described the meeting of the family at the monastery, the conversations with Alyosha, and the horrible scene of violence when the prisoner had rushed into his father's house just after dinner.
    Book 12 — A Judicial Error (48% in)

There are no more uses of "monastery" in The Brothers Karamazov.

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