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essential
used in The Fountainhead

15 uses
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Definition
necessary or important or relating to the basic nature of something
  • I am—essentially—such an earnest, single-toned Puritan that I must allow myself another color occasionally—to relieve the monotony.
    2.8 — Part 2 Chapter 8 (22% in)
essentially = basically (relating to the basic nature of something)
  • Professor Peterkin shook his hand, and patted his shoulder, saying: "...and you'll find it absolutely essential; for example, I had the experience when I built the Peabody Post Office..."
    1.2 — Part 1 Chapter 2 (26% in)
  • essential = necessary
  • I don't know what you'll cost me, but it's unessential, money is commonplace.
    2.4 — Part 2 Chapter 4 (78% in)
  • No other setting could bring out so eloquently the essential insolence of this building.
    2.7 — Part 2 Chapter 7 (2% in)
  • essential = basic (relating to the basic nature of something)
  • I wonder what you are—essentially.
    2.8 — Part 2 Chapter 8 (22% in)
  • essentially = basically (relating to the basic nature of something)
  • The architect is a metaphysical priest dealing in basic essentials, who has the courage to face the primal conception of reality as nonreality—since there is nothing and he creates nothingness.
    2.8 — Part 2 Chapter 8 (93% in)
  • essentials = things that are necessary
  • That play lacked essential kindness.
    2.8 — Part 2 Chapter 8 (99% in)
  • A famous actress wrote an article on the essential unity of all the arts, explained that the Stoddard Temple had no sense of structural diction, and spoke of the time when she had played Mary Magdalene in a great Biblical drama.
    2.12 — Part 2 Chapter 12 (18% in)
  • "I have endeavored to show," he said in conclusion, "that the two essentials of the conception of a temple are a sense of awe and a sense of man's humility."
    2.12 — Part 2 Chapter 12 (61% in)
  • essentials = necessary things
  • All of it tends to impress upon man his essential insignificance, to crush him by sheer magnitude, to imbue him with that sacred terror which leads to the meekness of virtue.
    2.12 — Part 2 Chapter 12 (62% in)
  • Very startling, even quite interesting at times, but essentially—adolescent.
    2.12 — Part 2 Chapter 12 (69% in)
  • essentially = basically (relating to the basic nature of something)
  • People in his neighborhood had clothes, horse wagons and money; degrees were inessential; but they did not read books.
    3.1 — Part 3 Chapter 1 (48% in)
  • Is there any essential difference?
    4.10 — Part 4 Chapter 10 (65% in)
  • ...In this day and age, when the world is torn by gigantic problems, seeking an answer to questions that hold the survival of man in the balance—this man attached to such a vague intangible, such an unessential as his artistic opinions sufficient importance to let it become his sole passion and the motivation of a crime against society.
    4.18 — Part 4 Chapter 18 (9% in)
  • The love of a man for the integrity of his work and his right to preserve it are now considered a vague intangible and an unessential.
    4.18 — Part 4 Chapter 18 (84% in)

There are no more uses of "essential" in The Fountainhead.

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