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naive
used in The Fountainhead

7 uses
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Definition
lacking experience or sophistication, and the understanding that comes from them — often too trusting or optimistic
  • For heaven's sake, can't you stop being so naive about it?
    1.1 — Part 1 Chapter 1 (67% in)
  • Keating made it known, with an air of naive confidence which implied that he was only a tool, no more than Tim's pencil or T-square, that his help enhanced Tim's importance rather than diminished it and, therefore, he did not wish to conceal it.
    1.5 — Part 1 Chapter 5 (6% in)
  • But since you are quite obviously naive and inexperienced, I shall point out to you that I am not in the habit of asking for the esthetic opinions of my draftsmen.
    1.8 — Part 1 Chapter 8 (24% in)
  • My dear Peter, how naive you are!
    2.3 — Part 2 Chapter 3 (92% in)
  • You're naive, Renee," shrugged Eve Layton.
    4.6 — Part 4 Chapter 6 (80% in)
  • He's a very naive person.
    4.7 — Part 4 Chapter 7 (64% in)
  • He's naive enough to think that men are motivated primarily by money.
    4.7 — Part 4 Chapter 7 (64% in)

There are no more uses of "naive" in The Fountainhead.

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