toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

decadent
used in The Fountainhead

6 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
marked by excessive self-indulgence and moral decay
  • When I'm in a mood for something decadent I'll probably meet him.
    1.10 — Part 1 Chapter 10 (39% in)
  • He explained that the decadence of architecture had come when private property replaced the communal spirit of the Middle Ages, and that the selfishness of individual owners—who built for no purpose save to satisfy their own bad taste, "all claim to an individual taste is bad taste"—had ruined the planned effect of cities.
    1.6 — Part 1 Chapter 6 (12% in)
  • We're too cynical, too decadent.
    1.12 — Part 1 Chapter 12 (33% in)
  • A society woman wrote an article on the exotic shrines she had seen in her dangerous jungle travels, praised the touching faith of the savages and reproached modern man for cynicism; the Stoddard Temple, she said, was a symptom of softness and decadence; the illustration showed her in breeches, one slim foot on the neck of a dead lion.
    2.12 — Part 2 Chapter 12 (19% in)
  • He looked like the decadent, overperfected end product of a long line of exquisite breeding—and everybody knew that he came from the gutter.
    3.1 — Part 3 Chapter 1 (4% in)
  • "You talk like a decadent bourgeois, Ellsworth," said Gus Webb.
    3.6 — Part 3 Chapter 6 (46% in)

There are no more uses of "decadent" in The Fountainhead.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®