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bacteria
used in Arrowsmith

33 uses
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Definition
microorganisms (living creatures so small it takes a microscope to see them) that can both cause disease and be beneficial. They are different and larger than viruses.
  • you may have hit on the supreme way to kill pathogenic bacteria.
    Chapter 29 (7% in)
bacteria = microorganisms (living creatures so small it takes a microscope to see them)

(editor's note:  Something that is pathogenic causes disease.)
  • Martin had been reading Max Gottlieb's scientific papers—as much of them as he could read, with their morass of mathematical symbols—and from them he had a conviction that experiments should be something dealing with the foundations of life and death, with the nature of bacterial infection, with the chemistry of bodily reactions.
    Chapter 3 (6% in)
  • They had studied the forms of bacteria, they had handled Petri dishes and platinum loops, they had proudly grown on potato slices the harmless red cultures of Bacillus prodigiosus, and they had come now to pathogenic germs and the inoculation of a living animal with swift disease.
    Chapter 4 (1% in)
  • While the assistant tagged the pig with a tin disk in its ear and restored it to the battery jar, Gottlieb set down its weight in a note-book, with the time of inoculation and the age of the bacterial culture.
    Chapter 4 (33% in)
  • I don't suppose you can bluff a bacteria—what is it?
    Chapter 6 (25% in)
  • bacterium?
    Chapter 6 (25% in)
  • There will never, in any age, be an effort to end the great epidemics or the petty infections which will not have been influenced by Max Gottlieb's researches, for he was not one who tagged and prettily classified bacteria and protozoa.
    Chapter 12 (21% in)
  • All day long he poured a solution of red ink from one test-tube into another, with his microscope carefully examined nothing at all, and answered the questions of persons who wished to know how you put bacterias to death once you had caught them swimming about.
    Chapter 23 (20% in)
  • He wasn't even doing experiments which might have diverted the Group—causing bacterial colonies to cloud liquids, or making things change color.
    Chapter 24 (40% in)
  • It collects as sediment the solids scattered through a liquid, such as bacteria in a solution.
    Chapter 26 (46% in)
  • That morning Martin had isolated a new strain of staphylococcus bacteria from the gluteal carbuncle of a patient in the Lower Manhattan Hospital, a carbuncle which was healing with unusual rapidity.
    Chapter 28 (5% in)
  • In eight hours a good growth of bacteria had appeared.
    Chapter 28 (6% in)
  • ...interested in it, and now, in his laboratory, he removed his military blouse, looked down to the lights on the blue-black river, smoked a little, thought what a dog he was not to be gentler to Leora, and damned Bert Tozer and Pickerbaugh and Tubbs and anybody else who was handy to his memory before he absent-mindedly wavered to the incubator, and found that the flask, in which there should have been a perceptible cloudy growth, had no longer any signs of bacteria—of staphylococci.
    Chapter 28 (8% in)
  • He discovered nothing but shadows of what had been bacteria: thin outlines, the form still there but the cell substance gone; minute skeletons on an infinitesimal battlefield.
    Chapter 28 (10% in)
  • A detective, hunting the murderer of bacteria, he stood with his head back, scratching his chin, scratching his memory for like cases of microorganisms committing suicide or being slain without perceptible cause.
    Chapter 28 (19% in)
  • He shook himself into calmness and settled down at a table, among rings and spirals of cigarette smoke, to list on small sheets of paper all the possible causes of suicide in the bacteria—all the questions he had to answer and the experiments which should answer them.
    Chapter 28 (24% in)
  • To test each of the four possible causes of the flask's clearing he prepared and seeded with bacteria a series of flasks under varying conditions, and set them away in the incubator at body temperature.
    Chapter 28 (29% in)
  • He cursed the delay involved in the growth of the bacteria, without which he could not discover the effect of the various sorts of broths and bacterial strains, but choked his impatience.
    Chapter 28 (32% in)
  • He cursed the delay involved in the growth of the bacteria, without which he could not discover the effect of the various sorts of broths and bacterial strains, but choked his impatience.
    Chapter 28 (32% in)
  • There was a cloudy appearance of bacteria in all the flasks except those in which he had used broth from the original alarming flask.
    Chapter 28 (43% in)
  • In these, the mysterious murderer of germs had prevented the growth of the new bacteria which he had introduced.
    Chapter 28 (43% in)
  • He dug down, before six, into a new layer of strength, and at six his examination showed that the flasks containing the original broth still had no growth of bacteria, and the flasks which he had seeded with the original pus had, like the first eccentric flask, after beginning to display a good growth of bacteria cleared up again under the slowly developing attack of the unknown assassin.
    Chapter 28 (49% in)
  • He dug down, before six, into a new layer of strength, and at six his examination showed that the flasks containing the original broth still had no growth of bacteria, and the flasks which he had seeded with the original pus had, like the first eccentric flask, after beginning to display a good growth of bacteria cleared up again under the slowly developing attack of the unknown assassin.
    Chapter 28 (49% in)
  • He tried, elaborately, with many flasks and many reseedings, to determine whether the X Principle would perpetuate itself indefinitely, whether when it was transmitted from tube to new tube of bacteria it would reappear, whether, growing by cell-division automatically, it was veritably a germ, a sub-germ infecting germs.
    Chapter 28 (60% in)
  • Tubbs gasped, assaulted his whiskers, did a moment of impressive thinking, and clamored: "Do you mean to say you think you've discovered an infectious disease of bacteria, and you haven't told me about it?
    Chapter 29 (7% in)
  • He had seen not the streets, but microorganisms large as jungle monsters, miles of flasks cloudy with bacteria, himself giving orders to his garcon, Max Gottlieb awesomely congratulating him.
    Chapter 32 (91% in)
  • Martin was at the moment hovering over a method of reproducing phage on dead bacteria, but he could not refuse, he could not risk being discharged.
    Chapter 38 (26% in)
  • He found a means of reproducing phage on dead bacteria by a very complicated, very delicate use of partial oxygen-carbon dioxide tension—as exquisite as cameo-carving, as improbable as weighing the stars.
    Chapter 38 (38% in)
  • Terry had discovered that certain quinine derivatives when introduced into the animal body slowly decompose into products which are highly toxic to bacteria but only mildly toxic to the body.
    Chapter 38 (43% in)
  • They had, they saw, to answer an interesting question: Do the quinine derivatives act by attaching themselves to the bacteria, or by changing the body fluids?
    Chapter 38 (48% in)
  • With excessive cordiality, with excessive applause when Clif remarked, "You better go back to work and put some salt on a coupla bacteria's tails," Martin guided him to the reception-room, safely past the girl clerk, and to the elevator.
    Chapter 39 (26% in)
  • He blundered into the effect of phage on the mutation of bacterial species—very beautiful, very delicate—and after plodding months when he had been a sane citizen, an almost good husband, an excellent bridge-player, and a rotten workman, he knew again the happiness of high taut insanity.
    Chapter 39 (70% in)
  • ...rumor panted that there was a new diversion in an exhausted world—going out to Martin's laboratory and watching him work, and being ever so silent and reverent, except perhaps when Joyce murmured, "Isn't he adorable the way he teaches his darling bacteria to say 'Pretty Polly'!" or when Latham Ireland convulsed them by arguing that scientists had no sense of humor, or Sammy de Lembre burst out in his marvelous burlesque of jazz: Oh, Mistah Back-sil-lil-us, don't you gri-in at me; You...
    Chapter 39 (81% in)

There are no more uses of "bacteria" in Arrowsmith.

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