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despair
used in Anne Of Green Gables

2 meanings, 16 uses
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1  —15 uses as in:
she felt despair
Definition
hopelessness; or distress (such as extreme worry or sadness from feeling powerless to change a bad situation)
  • First the look of despair faded out; then came a faint flush of hope; here eyes grew deep and bright as morning stars.
    Chapter 6 — Marilla Makes Up Her Mind (62% in)
despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • I'm in the depths of despair.
    Chapter 3 — Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised (47% in)
  • despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
  • Can you eat when you are in the depths of despair?
    Chapter 3 — Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised (47% in)
  • despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
  • "I've never been in the depths of despair, so I can't say," responded Marilla.
    Chapter 3 — Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised (48% in)
  • despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
  • Well, did you ever try to IMAGINE you were in the depths of despair?
    Chapter 3 — Marilla Cuthbert is Surprised (49% in)
  • despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
  • I'm not in the depths of despair this morning.
    Chapter 4 — Morning at Green Gables (31% in)
  • despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
  • She clasped her hands together, gave a piercing shriek, and then flung herself face downward on the bed, crying and writhing in an utter abandonment of disappointment and despair.
    Chapter 14 — Anne's Confession (60% in)
  • despair = hopelessness
  • Anne went back to Green Gables calm with despair.
    Chapter 16 — Diana Is Invited to Tea with Tragic Results (96% in)
  • despair = hopelessness
  • "I was awfully near giving up in despair," explained Anne.
    Chapter 18 — Anne to the Rescue (56% in)
  • despair = hopelessness
  • But one can't feel quite in the depths of despair with two months' vacation before them
    Chapter 21 — A New Departure in Flavorings (12% in)
  • despair = hopelessness
  • He had been in such a state of shyness and nervousness that Marilla had given him up in despair, but Anne took him in hand so successfully that he now sat at the table in his best clothes and white collar and talked to the minister not uninterestingly.
    Chapter 21 — A New Departure in Flavorings (75% in)
  • despair = hopelessness (of improving a bad situation)
  • I'm in the depths of despair and I don't care who gets head in class or writes the best composition or sings in the Sunday-school choir any more.
    Chapter 27 — Vanity and Vexation of Spirit (34% in)
  • despair = distress (at not knowing how to improve a bad situation)
  • Anne had slid to the floor in despairing obedience.
    Chapter 27 — Vanity and Vexation of Spirit (39% in)
  • despairing = hopeless
  • Anne wept then, but later on, when she went upstairs and looked in the glass, she was calm with despair.
    Chapter 27 — Vanity and Vexation of Spirit (83% in)
  • despair = hopelessness
  • "I can't think what it can be," said Anne in despair, "unless it's that Moody Spurgeon MacPherson saw you home from prayer meeting last night."
    Chapter 29 — An Epoch in Anne's Life (12% in)
despair = hopelessness
There are no more uses of "despair" flagged with this meaning in Anne Of Green Gables.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —1 use as in:
do not despair
Definition
to lose hope
  • Marilla had almost begun to despair of ever fashioning this waif of the world into her model little girl of demure manners and prim deportment.
    Chapter 22 — Anne is Invited Out to Tea (24% in)
despair = give up hope
There are no more uses of "despair" flagged with this meaning in Anne Of Green Gables.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®