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resignation
used in The Mill on the Floss

21 uses
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1  —2 uses as in:
accepted it with resignation
Definition
acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable or the lesser of evils
  • ...how could I be resigned to the loss of the one thing which had ever come to me on earth with the promise of such deep joy...
    7.3 — Book 7 Chapter 3 — Showing That Old Acquaintances Are Capable.... (70% in)
resigned = acceptance of something undesired as unavoidable
  • "Well, I'll go and fetch 'em, sister," said Mrs. Tulliver, resignedly.
    3.3 — Book 3 Chapter 3 — The Family Council (37% in)

There are no more uses of "resignation" flagged with this meaning in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —19 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • But I could see no issue that was not fatal for you; and that dread shut out the very thought of resignation.
    7.3 — Book 7 Chapter 3 — Showing That Old Acquaintances Are Capable.... (64% in)
  • She took no notice of her sister's remark, but threw back her capstrings and dispensed the pudding, in mute resignation.
    1.7 — Book 1 Chapter 7 — Enter the Aunts and Uncles (72% in)
  • Feeble limbs easily resign themselves to be tethered, and when we are subdued by sickness it seems possible to us to fulfil pledges which the old vigor comes back and breaks.
    3.9 — Book 3 Chapter 9 — An Item Added to the Family Register (3% in)
  • I have often said unto thee, and now again I say the same, Forsake thyself, resign thyself, and thou shalt enjoy much inward peace....
    4.3 — Book 4 Chapter 3 — A Voice from the Past (66% in)
  • ...belief in alcohol, and seek their ekstasis or outside standing-ground in gin; but the rest require something that good society calls "enthusiasm," something that will present motives in an entire absence of high prizes; something that will give patience and feed human love when the limbs ache with weariness, and human looks are hard upon us; something, clearly, that lies outside personal desires, that includes resignation for ourselves and active love for what is not ourselves.
    4.3 — Book 4 Chapter 3 — A Voice from the Past (83% in)
  • One would certainly suppose her to be farther on in life than her seventeenth year—perhaps because of the slow resigned sadness of the glance from which all search and unrest seem to have departed; perhaps because her broad-chested figure has the mould of early womanhood.
    5.1 — Book 5 Chapter 1 — In the Red Deeps (20% in)
  • And perhaps here was an opportunity indicated for making her mind more worthy of its highest service; perhaps the noblest, completest devoutness could hardly exist without some width of knowledge; must she always live in this resigned imprisonment?
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (6% in)
  • Is it not right to resign ourselves entirely, whatever may be denied us?
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (40% in)
  • Joy and peace are not resignation; resignation is the willing endurance of a pain that is not allayed, that you don't expect to be allayed.
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (43% in)
  • Joy and peace are not resignation; resignation is the willing endurance of a pain that is not allayed, that you don't expect to be allayed.
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (43% in)
  • Stupefaction is not resignation; and it is stupefaction to remain in ignorance,—to shut up all the avenues by which the life of your fellow-men might become known to you.
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (44% in)
  • I am not resigned; I am not sure that life is long enough to learn that lesson.
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (45% in)
  • You are not resigned; you are only trying to stupefy yourself.
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (45% in)
  • One day—it was the day of Philip's return—Lucy had formed a sudden engagement to spend the evening with Mrs. Kenn, whose delicate state of health, threatening to become confirmed illness through an attack of bronchitis, obliged her to resign her functions at the coming bazaar into the hands of other ladies, of whom she wished Lucy to be one.
    6.6 — Book 6 Chapter 6 — Illustrating the Laws of Attraction (48% in)
  • Philip had brightened at the proposition, for there is no feeling, perhaps, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music,—that does not make a man sing or play the better; and Philip had an abundance of pent-up feeling at this moment, as complex as any trio or quartet that was ever meant to express love and jealousy and resignation and fierce suspicion, all at the same time.
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (51% in)
  • Nothing short of having your heads served up in a dish like that mediaeval tenor or troubadour, would prevent you from expressing your entire resignation.
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (67% in)
  • But I see—I feel it is not so now; there are things we must renounce in life; some of us must resign love.
    6.11 — Book 6 Chapter 11 — In the Lane (85% in)
  • "As Miss Deane didn't know she was excluding others by inviting me," said Philip, "I am bound to resign."
    6.13 — Book 6 Chapter 13 — Borne Along by the Tide (25% in)
  • I told you long ago that I had never been resigned even to the mediocrity of my powers; how could I be resigned to the loss of the one thing which had ever come to me on earth with the promise of such deep joy as would give a new and blessed meaning to the foregoing pain,—the promise of another self that would lift my aching affection into the divine rapture of an ever-springing, ever-satisfied want?
    7.3 — Book 7 Chapter 3 — Showing That Old Acquaintances Are Capable.... (71% in)

There are no more uses of "resignation" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®