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capital
used in The Mill on the Floss

13 uses
  • By George, it makes a capital bit from this dark corner, with the curtain just marking it off.
    6.9 -- Book 6 Chapter 9 -- Charity in Full-Dress (45% in)
  • I mean to put him to some business as he can go into without capital, and I want to give him an eddication as he'll be even wi' the lawyers and folks, and put me up to a notion now an' then."
    1.7 -- Book 1 Chapter 7 -- Enter the Aunts and Uncles (82% in)
  • "But then, you know, it's an investment; Tom's eddication 'ull be so much capital to him."
    1.7 -- Book 1 Chapter 7 -- Enter the Aunts and Uncles (84% in)
  • ...in the course of his ride along the Basset lanes, with their deep ruts,—lying so far away from a market-town that the labor of drawing produce and manure was enough to take away the best part of the profits on such poor land as that parish was made of,—he got up a due amount of irritation against Moss as a man without capital, who, if murrain and blight were abroad, was sure to have his share of them, and who, the more you tried to help him out of the mud, would sink the further in.
    1.8 -- Book 1 Chapter 8 -- Mr. Tulliver Shows His Weaker Side (26% in)
  • "What's the use o' that," said Mr. Tulliver, sharply, "when a man marries, and's got no capital to work his farm but his wife's bit o' fortin?
    1.8 -- Book 1 Chapter 8 -- Mr. Tulliver Shows His Weaker Side (79% in)
  • ...not so the worthy tax-payers, who, having once pinched from real necessity, retained even in the midst of their comfortable retirement, with their wallfruit and wine-bins, the habit of regarding life as an ingenious process of nibbling out one's livelihood without leaving any perceptible deficit, and who would have been as immediately prompted to give up a newly taxed luxury when they had had their clear five hundred a year, as when they had only five hundred pounds of capital.
    1.12 -- Book 1 Chapter 12 -- Mr. and Mrs. Glegg at Home (55% in)
  • He was not going to be a snuffy schoolmaster, he, but a substantial man, like his father, who used to go hunting when he was younger, and rode a capital black mare,—as pretty a bit of horse-flesh as ever you saw; Tom had heard what her points were a hundred times.
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (2% in)
  • He had a true British determination to push his way in the world,—as a schoolmaster, in the first place, for there were capital masterships of grammar-schools to be had, and Mr. Stelling meant to have one of them; but as a preacher also, for he meant always to preach in a striking manner, so as to have his congregation swelled by admirers from neighboring parishes, and to produce a great sensation whenever he took occasional duty for a brother clergyman of minor gifts.
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (9% in)
  • It was really a capital investment; besides, Guest &Co. were going to bid for it.
    3.7 -- Book 3 Chapter 7 -- How a Hen Takes to Stratagem (94% in)
  • If I could get twenty or thirty pounds to begin with, I could pay five per cent for it, and then I could gradually make a little capital of my own, and do without a loan.
    5.2 -- Book 5 Chapter 2 -- Aunt Glegg Learns the Breadth of Bob's Thumb (39% in)
  • At the time of Maggie's first meeting with Philip, Tom had already nearly a hundred and fifty pounds of his own capital; and while they were walking by the evening light in the Red Deeps, he, by the same evening light, was riding into Laceham, proud of being on his first journey on behalf of Guest & Co., and revolving in his mind all the chances that by the end of another year he should have doubled his gains, lifted off the obloquy of debt from his father's name, and perhaps—for he...
    5.2 -- Book 5 Chapter 2 -- Aunt Glegg Learns the Breadth of Bob's Thumb (99% in)
  • Ours is a fine business,—a splendid concern, sir,—and there's no reason why it shouldn't go on growing; there's a growing capital, and growing outlets for it; but there's another thing that's wanted for the prosperity of every concern, large or small, and that's men to conduct it,—men of the right habits; none o' your flashy fellows, but such as are to be depended on.
    6.5 -- Book 6 Chapter 5 -- Showing That Tom Had Opened the Oyster (43% in)
  • —a capital light that from the roof, eh?" was, as usual, the first thing he said on entering the painting-room.
    6.8 -- Book 6 Chapter 8 -- Wakem in a New Light (8% in)

There are no more uses of "capital" in The Mill on the Floss.

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