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supposition
used in The Mill on the Floss

4 uses
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Definition
something put forth to believe as true — especially when others doubt that reality
  • Such a supposition could only have arisen from a too-superficial acquaintance with the habits of the Dodson family.
    1.9 -- Book 1 Chapter 9 -- To Garum Firs (30% in)
  • No news of his sister had been heard since Bob Jakin had come back in the steamer from Mudport, and put an end to all improbable suppositions of an accident on the water by stating that he had seen her land from a vessel with Mr. Stephen Guest.
    7.1 -- Book 7 Chapter 1 -- The Return to the Mill (7% in)
  • The tone of Stephen's letter, which he had read, and the actual relations of all the persons concerned, forced upon him powerfully the idea of an ultimate marriage between Stephen and Maggie as the least evil; and the impossibility of their proximity in St. Ogg's on any other supposition, until after years of separation, threw an insurmountable prospective difficulty over Maggie's stay there.
    7.2 -- Book 7 Chapter 2 -- St. Ogg's Passes Judgment (88% in)
  • Even on the supposition that required the utmost stretch of belief,—namely, that none of the things said about Miss Tulliver were true,—still, since they had been said about her, they had cast an odor round her which must cause her to be shrunk from by every woman who had to take care of her own reputation—and of Society.
    7.4 -- Book 7 Chapter 4 -- Maggie and Lucy (7% in)

There are no more uses of "supposition" in The Mill on the Floss.

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