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suggestive
used in The Mill on the Floss

5 uses
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Definition
tending to bring to mind

(When the thing brought to mind is not clear from context, it is often sex.)
  • On Wednesday, the day before the aunts and uncles were coming, there were such various and suggestive scents, as of plumcakes in the oven and jellies in the hot state, mingled with the aroma of gravy, that it was impossible to feel altogether gloomy: there was hope in the air.
    1.6 — Book 1 Chapter 6 — The Aunts and Uncles Are Coming (26% in)
  • One would need to be learned in the fashions of those times to know how far in the rear of them Mrs. Glegg's slate-colored silk gown must have been; but from certain constellations of small yellow spots upon it, and a mouldy odor about it suggestive of a damp clothes-chest, it was probable that it belonged to a stratum of garments just old enough to have come recently into wear.
    1.7 — Book 1 Chapter 7 — Enter the Aunts and Uncles (6% in)
  • Maggie kept her face buried without the aid of principle, for in that dream-suggestive attitude she had soon forgotten where she was, and her thoughts were busy with the poor deformed boy, who was so clever, when Tom called out, "Now then, Magsie!"
    2.5 — Book 2 Chapter 5 — Maggie's Second Visit (62% in)
  • "You talked o' the Mosses, and what Mr. Tulliver's done for 'em," said uncle Pullet, who became unusually suggestive where advances of money were concerned.
    3.3 — Book 3 Chapter 3 — The Family Council (33% in)
  • It was not a suggestive remark, and as the speaker did not follow it up by further development, it naturally left the conversation at a standstill.
    6.6 — Book 6 Chapter 6 — Illustrating the Laws of Attraction (65% in)

There are no more uses of "suggestive" in The Mill on the Floss.

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