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indicate
used in The Mill on the Floss

22 uses
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Definition
to show (point out, demonstrate, express, or suggest)
  • Mrs. Tulliver looked earnestly at the point indicated, and turned her head on one side.
    1.9 — Book 1 Chapter 9 — To Garum Firs (38% in)
  • And he had really given himself the trouble of recommending Mr. Stelling to his friend Tulliver without any positive expectation of a solid, definite advantage resulting to himself, notwithstanding the subtle indications to the contrary which might have misled a too-sagacious observer.
    1.3 — Book 1 Chapter 3 — Mr. Riley Gives His Advice Concerning.... (80% in)
  • Perceiving that the tears are hurrying fast, she unpins her strings and throws them languidly backward, a touching gesture, indicative, even in the deepest gloom, of the hope in future dry moments when cap-strings will once more have a charm.
    1.7 — Book 1 Chapter 7 — Enter the Aunts and Uncles (18% in)
  • ...as irrelevant to the daylight as a last night's guttered candle,—all this may not seem a very seductive form of temptation; but the majority of men in Basset found it fatally alluring when encountered on their road toward four o'clock on a wintry afternoon; and if any wife in Basset wished to indicate that her husband was not a pleasure-seeking man, she could hardly do it more emphatically than by saying that he didn't spend a shilling at Dickison's from one Whitsuntide to another.
    1.8 — Book 1 Chapter 8 — Mr. Tulliver Shows His Weaker Side (38% in)
  • ...border under his outdoor cap, he was often observed peeping through the bars of a gate and making minatory gestures with his small forefinger while he scolded the sheep with an inarticulate burr, intended to strike terror into their astonished minds; indicating thus early that desire for mastery over the inferior animals, wild and domestic, including cockchafers, neighbors' dogs, and small sisters, which in all ages has been an attribute of so much promise for the fortunes of our race.
    1.9 — Book 1 Chapter 9 — To Garum Firs (53% in)
  • Mrs. Glegg felt there was really something in this, but she tossed her head and emitted a guttural interjection to indicate that her silence was only an armistice, not a peace.
    1.12 — Book 1 Chapter 12 — Mr. and Mrs. Glegg at Home (78% in)
  • ...consisted in the narration of the case and the enforcement of Mr. Tulliver's views concerning it throughout the entire circle of his connections would necessarily take time; and at the beginning of February, when Tom was going to school again, there were scarcely any new items to be detected in his father's statement of the case against Pivart, or any more specific indication of the measures he was bent on taking against that rash contravener of the principle that water was water.
    2.2 — Book 2 Chapter 2 — The Christmas Holidays (92% in)
  • ...self-taught skill in drawing was another link between them; for Tom found, to his disgust, that his new drawing-master gave him no dogs and donkeys to draw, but brooks and rustic bridges and ruins, all with a general softness of black-lead surface, indicating that nature, if anything, was rather satiny; and as Tom's feeling for the picturesque in landscape was at present quite latent, it is not surprising that Mr. Goodrich's productions seemed to him an uninteresting form of art.
    2.4 — Book 2 Chapter 4 — "The Young Idea" (11% in)
  • Tom gave the requisite pantomime to indicate the double enjoyment of pulling the trigger and thrusting the spear.
    2.4 — Book 2 Chapter 4 — "The Young Idea" (65% in)
  • Each vacation he brought home a new book or two, indicating his progress through different stages of history, Christian doctrine, and Latin literature; and that passage was not entirely without results, besides the possession of the books.
    2.7 — Book 2 Chapter 7 — The Golden Gates Are Passed (21% in)
  • Since these were the consequences of going to law, his father was really blamable, as his aunts and uncles had always said he was; and it was a significant indication of Tom's character, that though he thought his aunts ought to do something more for his mother, he felt nothing like Maggie's violent resentment against them for showing no eager tenderness and generosity.
    3.5 — Book 3 Chapter 5 — Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (4% in)
  • A Dodson would not be taxed with the omission of anything that was becoming, or that belonged to that eternal fitness of things which was plainly indicated in the practice of the most substantial parishioners, and in the family traditions,—such as obedience to parents, faithfulness to kindred, industry, rigid honesty, thrift, the thorough scouring of wooden and copper utensils, the hoarding of coins likely to disappear from the currency, the production of first-rate commodities for the...
    4.1 — Book 4 Chapter 1 — A Variation of Protestantism Unknown to Bossuet (63% in)
  • Mrs. Pullet had always thought it strange if Tom's excellent complexion, so entirely that of the Dodsons, did not argue a certainty that he would turn out well; his juvenile errors of running down the peacock, and general disrespect to his aunts, only indicating a tinge of Tulliver blood which he had doubtless outgrown.
    5.2 — Book 5 Chapter 2 — Aunt Glegg Learns the Breadth of Bob's Thumb (13% in)
  • Tom, meanwhile, had shown no disposition to rely on any one but himself, though, with a natural sensitiveness toward all indications of favorable opinion, he was glad to see his uncle Glegg look in on him sometimes in a friendly way during business hours, and glad to be invited to dine at his house, though he usually preferred declining on the ground that he was not sure of being punctual.
    5.2 — Book 5 Chapter 2 — Aunt Glegg Learns the Breadth of Bob's Thumb (15% in)
  • And perhaps here was an opportunity indicated for making her mind more worthy of its highest service; perhaps the noblest, completest devoutness could hardly exist without some width of knowledge; must she always live in this resigned imprisonment?
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (5% in)
  • This wide statement, by which Mrs. Pullet represented the fact that she had twice seen Philip at the spot indicated, produced an effect on Maggie which was all the stronger because Tom sate opposite her, and she was intensely anxious to look indifferent.
    5.5 — Book 5 Chapter 5 — The Cloven Tree (20% in)
  • At least this was the effect on Lucy; and you will not, I hope, consider it an indication of vanity predominating over more tender impulses, that she just glanced in the chimney-glass as her walk brought her near it.
    6.1 — Book 6 Chapter 1 — A Duet in Paradise (77% in)
  • It was too late for Maggie to speak now; the drawingroom door was opening, and Minny was already growling in a small way at the entrance of a tall gentleman, who went up to Lucy and took her hand with a half-polite, half-tender glance and tone of inquiry, which seemed to indicate that he was unconscious of any other presence.
    6.2 — Book 6 Chapter 2 — First Impressions (37% in)
  • It was not that she thought distinctly of Mr. Stephen Guest, or dwelt on the indications that he looked at her with admiration; it was rather that she felt the half-remote presence of a world of love and beauty and delight, made up of vague, mingled images from all the poetry and romance she had ever read, or had ever woven in her dreamy reveries.
    6.3 — Book 6 Chapter 3 — Confidential Moments (21% in)
  • Not that her enjoyment of music was of the kind that indicates a great specific talent; it was rather that her sensibility to the supreme excitement of music was only one form of that passionate sensibility which belonged to her whole nature, and made her faults and virtues all merge in each other; made her affections sometimes an impatient demand, but also prevented her vanity from taking the form of mere feminine coquetry and device, and gave it the poetry of ambition.
    6.6 — Book 6 Chapter 6 — Illustrating the Laws of Attraction (21% in)
  • Philip was silent a few moments, and then said, in that high, feeble voice which with him indicated the resolute suppression of emotion,— "Is there no other alternative, Maggie?
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (27% in)
  • Lucy, accustomed to watch all indications in her father, and having reasons, which had recently become strong, for an extra interest in what referred to the Wakems, felt an unsual curiosity to know what had prompted her father's questions.
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (84% in)

There are no more uses of "indicate" in The Mill on the Floss.

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