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breech
used in The Mill on the Floss

2 uses
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Definition
rear in various senses. It is most commonly used today in the phrase breech birth in reference to a baby who comes out of the birth canal butt-first rather than head-first. More-archaic senses seen in classic literature include:
  • breechcloth — a form of loincloth consisting in a strip of material passed between the thighs and held up in front and behind by a belt or string
  • breeches — pants
  • a cannon's breech — the rear of a gun
  • Mr. Tulliver paused a minute or two, and dived with both hands into his breeches pockets as if he hoped to find some suggestion there.
    1.2 -- Book 1 Chapter 2 -- Mr. Tulliver, of Dorlcote Mill, Declares…. (36% in)
  • But the indefinable weight the dead rabbits had left on her mind caused her to feel more than usual pity for the career of this weak young man, particularly when she looked at the picture where he leaned against a tree with a flaccid appearance, his knee-breeches unbuttoned and his wig awry, while the swine apparently of some foreign breed, seemed to insult him by their good spirits over their feast of husks.
    1.4 -- Book 1 Chapter 4 -- Tom Is Expected (95% in)

There are no more uses of "breech" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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