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refuge
used in The Mill on the Floss

10 uses
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Definition
something giving protection — especially a safe place
  • But the fact was so, for at the next bend in the lane Maggie actually saw the little semicircular black tent with the blue smoke rising before it, which was to be her refuge from all the blighting obloquy that had pursued her in civilized life.
    1.11 -- Book 1 Chapter 11 -- Maggie Tries to Run away from Her Shadow (29% in)
  • To-day however, Maggie thought her misery had reached a pitch at which gypsydom was her refuge, and she rose from her seat on the roots of the tree with the sense that this was a great crisis in her life; she would run straight away till she came to Dunlow Common, where there would certainly be gypsies; and cruel Tom, and the rest of her relations who found fault with her, should never see her any more.
    1.11 -- Book 1 Chapter 11 -- Maggie Tries to Run away from Her Shadow (4% in)
  • It was a dark, chill, misty morning, likely to end in rain,—one of those mornings when even happy people take refuge in their hopes.
    3.5 -- Book 3 Chapter 5 -- Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (2% in)
  • Poor Tom was not without his hopes to take refuge in under the chill damp imprisonment of the December fog, which seemed only like a part of his home troubles.
    3.5 -- Book 3 Chapter 5 -- Tom Applies His Knife to the Oyster (8% in)
  • ...childhood, and its memories of long quiet talk confirming by distinct successive impressions the first instinctive bias,—the fact that in him the appeal was more strongly to her pity and womanly devotedness than to her vanity or other egoistic excitability of her nature,—seemed now to make a sort of sacred place, a sanctuary where she could find refuge from an alluring influence which the best part of herself must resist; which must bring horrible tumult within, wretchedness without.
    6.7 -- Book 6 Chapter 7 -- Philip Re-enters (12% in)
  • The middle-aged, who have lived through their strongest emotions, but are yet in the time when memory is still half passionate and not merely contemplative, should surely be a sort of natural priesthood, whom life has disciplined and consecrated to be the refuge and rescue of early stumblers and victims of self-despair.
    6.9 -- Book 6 Chapter 9 -- Charity in Full-Dress (64% in)
  • That deep-rooted fear was shaking Maggie now; but her mind was unswervingly bent on returning to her brother, as the natural refuge that had been given her.
    7.1 -- Book 7 Chapter 1 -- The Return to the Mill (13% in)
  • "Tom," she began faintly, "I am come back to you,—I am come back home—for refuge—to tell you everything."
    7.1 -- Book 7 Chapter 1 -- The Return to the Mill (23% in)
  • Life stretched before her as one act of penitence; and all she craved, as she dwelt on her future lot, was something to guarantee her from more falling; her own weakness haunted her like a vision of hideous possibilities, that made no peace conceivable except such as lay in the sense of a sure refuge.
    7.2 -- Book 7 Chapter 2 -- St. Ogg's Passes Judgment (35% in)
  • She seized an oar and began to paddle the boat forward with the energy of wakening hope; the dawning seemed to advance more swiftly, now she was in action; and she could soon see the poor dumb beasts crowding piteously on a mound where they had taken refuge.
    7.5 -- Book 7 Chapter 5 -- The Last Conflict (64% in)

There are no more uses of "refuge" in The Mill on the Floss.

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