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predominant
used in The Mill on the Floss

19 uses
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Definition
most frequent, common, or important; or having more power and influence
  • Mr. Guest and Mr. Wakem were on friendly dining terms, and the attorney liked to predominate over a ship-owner and mill-owner who was a little too loud in the town affairs as well as in his table-talk.
    3.7 — Book 3 Chapter 7 — How a Hen Takes to Stratagem (94% in)
  • What the father would say if Maggie was lost, was a question that predominated over every other.
    1.10 — Book 1 Chapter 10 — Maggie Behaves Worse Than She Expected (**% in)
  • He was a very firm, not to say obstinate, disposition, but there was no brute-like rebellion and recklessness in his nature; the human sensibilities predominated, and if it had occurred to him that he could enable himself to show some quickness at his lessons, and so acquire Mr. Stelling's approbation, by standing on one leg for an inconvenient length of time, or rapping his head moderately against the wall, or any voluntary action of that sort, he would certainly have tried it.
    2.1 — Book 2 Chapter 1 — Tom's "First Half" (45% in)
  • He was a boy who adhered tenaciously to impressions once received; as with all minds in which mere perception predominates over thought and emotion, the external remained to him rigidly what it was in the first instance.
    2.4 — Book 2 Chapter 4 — "The Young Idea" (2% in)
  • There are certain animals to which tenacity of position is a law of life,—they can never flourish again, after a single wrench: and there are certain human beings to whom predominance is a law of life,—they can only sustain humiliation so long as they can refuse to believe in it, and, in their own conception, predominate still.
    3.1 — Book 3 Chapter 1 — What Had Happened at Home (40% in)
  • There are certain animals to which tenacity of position is a law of life,—they can never flourish again, after a single wrench: and there are certain human beings to whom predominance is a law of life,—they can only sustain humiliation so long as they can refuse to believe in it, and, in their own conception, predominate still.
    3.1 — Book 3 Chapter 1 — What Had Happened at Home (41% in)
  • Mr. Tulliver was still predominating, in his own imagination, as he approached St. Ogg's, through which he had to pass on his way homeward.
    3.1 — Book 3 Chapter 1 — What Had Happened at Home (42% in)
  • Mrs. Tulliver, always borne down by the family predominance of sister Jane, who had made her wear the yoke of a younger sister in very tender years, said pleadingly: "I'm sure, sister, I've never asked anybody to do anything, only buy things as it 'ud be a pleasure to 'em to have, so as they mightn't go and be spoiled i' strange houses.
    3.3 — Book 3 Chapter 3 — The Family Council (27% in)
  • His longing to see Maggie, and make an element in her life, had in it some of that savage impulse to snatch an offered joy which springs from a life in which the mental and bodily constitution have made pain predominate.
    5.3 — Book 5 Chapter 3 — The Wavering Balance (86% in)
  • The feeling of injury on her own behalf could not predominate at that moment.
    5.6 — Book 5 Chapter 6 — The Hard-Won Triumph (30% in)
  • The sight of the long-hated predominant man down, and in his power, threw him into a frenzy of triumphant vengeance, which seemed to give him preternatural agility and strength.
    5.7 — Book 5 Chapter 7 — A Day of Reckoning (40% in)
  • "But, father, dear father," said Maggie, an unspeakable anxiety predominating over her grief, "you forgive him—you forgive every one now?"
    5.7 — Book 5 Chapter 7 — A Day of Reckoning (89% in)
  • At least this was the effect on Lucy; and you will not, I hope, consider it an indication of vanity predominating over more tender impulses, that she just glanced in the chimney-glass as her walk brought her near it.
    6.1 — Book 6 Chapter 1 — A Duet in Paradise (77% in)
  • And Lucy had so much of this benevolence in her nature that I am inclined to think her small egoisms were impregnated with it, just as there are people not altogether unknown to you whose small benevolences have a predominant and somewhat rank odor of egoism.
    6.1 — Book 6 Chapter 1 — A Duet in Paradise (80% in)
  • Under the charm of her new pleasures, Maggie herself was ceasing to think, with her eager prefiguring imagination, of her future lot; and her anxiety about her first interview with Philip was losing its predominance; perhaps, unconsciously to herself, she was not sorry that the interview had been deferred.
    6.6 — Book 6 Chapter 6 — Illustrating the Laws of Attraction (28% in)
  • That has generally been observed in men of great administrative capacity, I believe,—a tendency to predominance of the reflective powers in me!
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (52% in)
  • "I have observed a tendency to predominance," she said, smiling; and Philip at that moment devoutly hoped that she found the tendency disagreeable.
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (53% in)
  • When, at last, the need for belief in Maggie rose to its habitual predominance, he was not long in imagining the truth,—she was struggling, she was banishing herself; this was the clue to all he had seen since his return.
    6.13 — Book 6 Chapter 13 — Borne Along by the Tide (37% in)
  • Still two or three more days passed, and Maggie heard nothing of Philip; anxiety about him was becoming her predominant trouble, and she summoned courage at last to inquire about him of Dr. Kenn, on his next visit to her.
    7.3 — Book 7 Chapter 3 — Showing That Old Acquaintances Are Capable.... (50% in)

There are no more uses of "predominant" in The Mill on the Floss.

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