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metaphor
used in The Mill on the Floss

6 uses
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Definition
a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote

For example, Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." Shakespeare is not saying the world is really a stage and all people are actors, but there are similarities he wants us to recognize.
  • It is astonishing what a different result one gets by changing the metaphor!
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (37% in)
  • Whence Mr. Stelling concluded that Tom's brain, being peculiarly impervious to etymology and demonstrations, was peculiarly in need of being ploughed and harrowed by these patent implements; it was his favorite metaphor, that the classics and geometry constituted that culture of the mind which prepared it for the reception of any subsequent crop.
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (36% in)
  • O Aristotle! if you had had the advantage of being "the freshest modern" instead of the greatest ancient, would you not have mingled your praise of metaphorical speech, as a sign of high intelligence, with a lamentation that intelligence so rarely shows itself in speech without metaphor,—that we can so seldom declare what a thing is, except by saying it is something else?
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (38% in)
  • O Aristotle! if you had had the advantage of being "the freshest modern" instead of the greatest ancient, would you not have mingled your praise of metaphorical speech, as a sign of high intelligence, with a lamentation that intelligence so rarely shows itself in speech without metaphor,—that we can so seldom declare what a thing is, except by saying it is something else?
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (39% in)
  • Tom Tulliver, being abundant in no form of speech, did not use any metaphor to declare his views as to the nature of Latin; he never called it an instrument of torture; and it was not until he had got on some way in the next half-year, and in the Delectus, that he was advanced enough to call it a "bore" and "beastly stuff."
    2.1 -- Book 2 Chapter 1 -- Tom's "First Half" (39% in)
  • Wakem, to his certain knowledge, was (metaphorically speaking) at the bottom of Pivart's irrigation; Wakem had tried to make Dix stand out, and go to law about the dam; it was unquestionably Wakem who had caused Mr. Tulliver to lose the suit about the right of road and the bridge that made a thoroughfare of his land for every vagabond who preferred an opportunity of damaging private property to walking like an honest man along the highroad; all lawyers were more or less rascals, but...
    2.2 -- Book 2 Chapter 2 -- The Christmas Holidays (77% in)

There are no more uses of "metaphor" in The Mill on the Floss.

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