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martial
used in The Mill on the Floss

3 uses
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Definition
relating to war or soldiers
most commonly seen in these expressions:
  • "court martial" — a military court that tries military personnel using military law (which is different than civilian law)
  • "martial law" — the body of law imposed by the military over civilian affairs which can be declared to replace ordinary civilian law in a time of crisis
  • "And General Wolfe, Mr. Poulter,—wasn't he a wonderful fighter?" said Tom, who held the notion that all the martial heroes commemorated on the public-house signs were engaged in the war with Bony.
    2.4 -- Book 2 Chapter 4 -- "The Young Idea" (59% in)
  • Still, he carried himself with martial erectness, had his clothes scrupulously brushed, and his trousers tightly strapped; and on the Wednesday and Saturday afternoons, when he came to Tom, he was always inspired with gin and old memories, which gave him an exceptionally spirited air, as of a superannuated charger who hears the drum.
    2.4 -- Book 2 Chapter 4 -- "The Young Idea" (50% in)
  • If you think a lad of thirteen would have been so childish, you must be an exceptionally wise man, who, although you are devoted to a civil calling, requiring you to look bland rather than formidable, yet never, since you had a beard, threw yourself into a martial attitude, and frowned before the looking-glass.
    2.4 -- Book 2 Chapter 4 -- "The Young Idea" (99% in)

There are no more uses of "martial" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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