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malicious
used in The Mill on the Floss

4 uses
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Definition
wanting to see others suffer; or threatening evil
  • "Then I may call and tell Bessy you'll bear no malice, and everything be as it was before?"
    1.13 -- Book 1 Chapter 13 -- Mr. Tulliver Further Entangles the Skeinů. (29% in)
  • "It's not to be expected, I suppose," observed Mrs. Glegg, by way of winding up the subject, "as I shall go to the mill again before Bessy comes to see me, or as I shall go and fall down o' my knees to Mr. Tulliver, and ask his pardon for showing him favors; but I shall bear no malice, and when Mr. Tulliver speaks civil to me, I'll speak civil to him.
    1.13 -- Book 1 Chapter 13 -- Mr. Tulliver Further Entangles the Skeinů. (14% in)
  • Wakem was not without this parenthetic vindictiveness toward the uncomplimentary miller; and now Mrs. Tulliver had put the notion into his head, it presented itself to him as a pleasure to do the very thing that would cause Mr. Tulliver the most deadly mortification,— and a pleasure of a complex kind, not made up of crude malice, but mingling with it the relish of self-approbation.
    3.7 -- Book 3 Chapter 7 -- How a Hen Takes to Stratagem (88% in)
  • "It's wicked to curse and bear malice."
    3.9 -- Book 3 Chapter 9 -- An Item Added to the Family Register (90% in)

There are no more uses of "malicious" in The Mill on the Floss.

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