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inclined
used in The Mill on the Floss

36 uses
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1  —1 use as in:
I'm inclined to
Definition
a tendency, mood, desire, or attitude that favors something; or making someone favor something
  • ...he checked his inclination to laugh, and said quietly...
    2.3 — Book 2 Chapter 3 — The New Schoolfellow (53% in)
inclination = tendency (desire)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
There are no more uses of "inclined" flagged with this meaning in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —35 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • Mr. Stelling was a well-sized, broad-chested man, not yet thirty, with flaxen hair standing erect, and large lightish-gray eyes, which were always very wide open; he had a sonorous bass voice, and an air of defiant self-confidence inclining to brazenness.
    2.1 — Book 2 Chapter 1 — Tom's "First Half" (9% in)
  • Maggie shut up the book at once, with a sense of disgrace, but not being inclined to see after her mother, she compromised the matter by going into a dark corner behind her father's chair, and nursing her doll, toward which she had an occasional fit of fondness in Tom's absence, neglecting its toilet, but lavishing so many warm kisses on it that the waxen cheeks had a wasted, unhealthy appearance.
    1.3 — Book 1 Chapter 3 — Mr. Riley Gives His Advice Concerning.... (37% in)
  • He was not inclined to cry, and did not feel that Maggie's grief spoiled his prospect of the sweets; but he went and put his head near her, and said in a lower, comforting tone,— "Won't you come, then, Magsie?
    1.7 — Book 1 Chapter 7 — Enter the Aunts and Uncles (63% in)
  • ...Englishmen at his back, not to speak of Blucher and the Prussians, who, as Mr. Tulliver had heard from a person of particular knowledge in that matter, had come up in the very nick of time; though here there was a slight dissidence, Mr. Deane remarking that he was not disposed to give much credit to the Prussians,—the build of their vessels, together with the unsatisfactory character of transactions in Dantzic beer, inclining him to form rather a low view of Prussian pluck generally.
    1.7 — Book 1 Chapter 7 — Enter the Aunts and Uncles (98% in)
  • I incline to the briefest, since, if it should not be wholly true, it is at least likely to contain the least falsehood.
    1.12 — Book 1 Chapter 12 — Mr. and Mrs. Glegg at Home (8% in)
  • Being always on the defensive toward her own sisters, it was natural that she should be keenly conscious of her superiority, even as the weakest Dodson, over a husband's sister, who, besides being poorly off, and inclined to "hang on" her brother, had the good-natured submissiveness of a large, easy-tempered, untidy, prolific woman, with affection enough in her not only for her own husband and abundant children, but for any number of collateral relations.
    2.2 — Book 2 Chapter 2 — The Christmas Holidays (59% in)
  • No woman is; she can always incline him to do either what she wishes, or the reverse; and on the composite impulses that were threatening to hurry Mr. Tulliver into "law," Mrs. Tulliver's monotonous pleading had doubtless its share of force; it might even be comparable to that proverbial feather which has the credit or discredit of breaking the camel's back; though, on a strictly impartial view, the blame ought rather to lie with the previous weight of feathers which had already placed...
    2.2 — Book 2 Chapter 2 — The Christmas Holidays (69% in)
  • In like manner, Mr. Stelling had a fixed opinion that all boys with any capacity could learn what it was the only regular thing to teach; if they were slow, the thumb-screw must be tightened,—the exercises must be insisted on with increased severity, and a page of Virgil be awarded as a penalty, to encourage and stimulate a too languid inclination to Latin verse.
    2.4 — Book 2 Chapter 4 — "The Young Idea" (39% in)
  • The corners of Tom's mouth showed an inclination to a smile of complacency that was immediately checked as inconsistent with the severity of a great warrior.
    2.5 — Book 2 Chapter 5 — Maggie's Second Visit (83% in)
  • His natural inclination to blame, hitherto kept entirely in abeyance toward his father by the predisposition to think him always right, simply on the ground that he was Tom Tulliver's father, was turned into this new channel by his mother's plaints; and with his indignation against Wakem there began to mingle some indignation of another sort.
    3.2 — Book 3 Chapter 2 — Mrs. Tulliver's Teraphim, or Household Gods (70% in)
  • And now that Mrs. Tulliver had come to the conclusion that her husband was very much in the wrong to bring her into this trouble, she was inclined to think that his opinion of Wakem was wrong too.
    3.7 — Book 3 Chapter 7 — How a Hen Takes to Stratagem (28% in)
  • But when Mr. Tulliver called Wakem a rascal at the market dinner-table, the attorneys' clients were not a whit inclined to withdraw their business from him; and if, when Wakem himself happened to be present, some jocose cattle-feeder, stimulated by opportunity and brandy, made a thrust at him by alluding to old ladies' wills, he maintained perfect sang froid, and knew quite well that the majority of substantial men then present were perfectly contented with the fact that "Wakem was...
    3.7 — Book 3 Chapter 7 — How a Hen Takes to Stratagem (76% in)
  • Tom said nothing; he was still struggling against his inclination to rush away.
    3.8 — Book 3 Chapter 8 — Daylight on the Wreck (65% in)
  • If thou desirest to mount unto this height, thou must set out courageously, and lay the axe to the root, that thou mayest pluck up and destroy that hidden inordinate inclination to thyself, and unto all private and earthly good.
    4.3 — Book 4 Chapter 3 — A Voice from the Past (60% in)
  • It was far on in June now, and Maggie was inclined to lengthen the daily walk which was her one indulgence; but this day and the following she was so busy with work which must be finished that she never went beyond the gate, and satisfied her need of the open air by sitting out of doors.
    5.1 — Book 5 Chapter 1 — In the Red Deeps (10% in)
  • It seemed to her inclination, that to see Philip now and then, and keep up the bond of friendship with him, was something not only innocent, but good; perhaps she might really help him to find contentment as she had found it.
    5.1 — Book 5 Chapter 1 — In the Red Deeps (61% in)
  • After the painful news had been told, he sat in silence; he had not spirit or inclination to tell his mother and sister anything about the dinner; they hardly cared to ask it.
    5.7 — Book 5 Chapter 7 — A Day of Reckoning (64% in)
  • And there was that slight pressure of the hands, and momentary meeting of the eyes, which will often leave a little lady with a slight flush and smile on her face that do not subside immediately when the door is closed, and with an inclination to walk up and down the room rather than to seat herself quietly at her embroidery, or other rational and improving occupation.
    6.1 — Book 6 Chapter 1 — A Duet in Paradise (76% in)
  • And Lucy had so much of this benevolence in her nature that I am inclined to think her small egoisms were impregnated with it, just as there are people not altogether unknown to you whose small benevolences have a predominant and somewhat rank odor of egoism.
    6.1 — Book 6 Chapter 1 — A Duet in Paradise (79% in)
  • Lucy had said he was inclined to be satirical, and Maggie had mentally supplied the addition, "and rather conceited."
    6.2 — Book 6 Chapter 2 — First Impressions (43% in)
  • Then followed the recommendation to choose Southey's "Life of Cowper," unless she were inclined to be philosophical, and startle the ladies of St. Ogg's by voting for one of the Bridgewater Treatises.
    6.2 — Book 6 Chapter 2 — First Impressions (72% in)
  • The exercise brought the warm blood into her cheeks, and made her inclined to take her lesson merrily.
    6.2 — Book 6 Chapter 2 — First Impressions (90% in)
  • Chapter III Confidential Moments When Maggie went up to her bedroom that night, it appeared that she was not at all inclined to undress.
    6.3 — Book 6 Chapter 3 — Confidential Moments (1% in)
  • I am afraid there would have been a subtle, stealing gratification in her mind if she had known how entirely this saucy, defiant Stephen was occupied with her; how he was passing rapidly from a determination to treat her with ostentatious indifference to an irritating desire for some sign of inclination from her,—some interchange of subdued word or look with her.
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (71% in)
  • Stephen's voice, pouring in again, jarred upon his nervous susceptibility as if it had been the clang of sheet-iron, and he felt inclined to make the piano shriek in utter discord.
    6.7 — Book 6 Chapter 7 — Philip Re-enters (77% in)
  • But now his eyes were devouring Maggie; he felt inclined to kick young Torry out of the dance, and take his place.
    6.10 — Book 6 Chapter 10 — The Spell Seems Broken (24% in)
  • "You don't seem inclined for boating," said Lucy, when he came to sit down by her on the bench.
    6.13 — Book 6 Chapter 13 — Borne Along by the Tide (23% in)
  • The leap had been taken now; he had been tortured by scruples, he had fought fiercely with overmastering inclination, he had hesitated; but repentance was impossible.
    6.13 — Book 6 Chapter 13 — Borne Along by the Tide (91% in)
  • "Remember what you felt weeks ago," she began, with beseeching earnestness; "remember what we both felt,—that we owed ourselves to others, and must conquer every inclination which could make us false to that debt.
    6.14 — Book 6 Chapter 14 — Waking (49% in)
  • We should have no law but the inclination of the moment.
    6.14 — Book 6 Chapter 14 — Waking (52% in)
  • Tom, like every one of us, was imprisoned within the limits of his own nature, and his education had simply glided over him, leaving a slight deposit of polish; if you are inclined to be severe on his severity, remember that the responsibility of tolerance lies with those who have the wider vision.
    7.3 — Book 7 Chapter 3 — Showing That Old Acquaintances Are Capable.... (24% in)
  • But the overpowering heat inclines me to be perfectly quiescent in the daytime.
    7.3 — Book 7 Chapter 3 — Showing That Old Acquaintances Are Capable.... (97% in)
  • That Authority had furnished a very explicit answer to persons who might inquire where their social duties began, and might be inclined to take wide views as to the starting-point.
    7.4 — Book 7 Chapter 4 — Maggie and Lucy (20% in)
  • The masculine mind of St. Ogg's smiled pleasantly, and did not wonder that Kenn liked to see a fine pair of eyes daily, or that he was inclined to take so lenient a view of the past; the feminine mind, regarded at that period as less powerful, took a more melancholy view of the case.
    7.4 — Book 7 Chapter 4 — Maggie and Lucy (41% in)
  • Dr. Kenn, having a conscience void of offence in the matter, was still inclined to persevere,—was still averse to give way before a public sentiment that was odious and contemptible; but he was finally wrought upon by the consideration of the peculiar responsibility attached to his office, of avoiding the appearance of evil,—an "appearance" that is always dependent on the average quality of surrounding minds.
    7.5 — Book 7 Chapter 5 — The Last Conflict (12% in)

There are no more uses of "inclined" in The Mill on the Floss.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®