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formidable
used in The Mill on the Floss

7 uses
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Definition
intimidating or impressive — arousing fear or admiration due to impressiveness or challenge
  • Mr. Poulter, who was understood by the company at the Black Swan to have once struck terror into the hearts of the French, was no longer personally formidable.
    2.4 -- Book 2 Chapter 4 -- "The Young Idea" (49% in)
  • Mr. Rappit, the hair-dresser, with his well-anointed coronal locks tending wavily upward, like the simulated pyramid of flame on a monumental urn, seemed to her at that moment the most formidable of her contemporaries, into whose street at St. Ogg's she would carefully refrain from entering through the rest of her life.
    1.9 -- Book 1 Chapter 9 -- To Garum Firs (3% in)
  • The formidable strangers were two shabby-looking men with flushed faces, one of them carrying a bundle on a stick over his shoulder; but to her surprise, while she was dreading their disapprobation as a runaway, the man with the bundle stopped, and in a half-whining, half-coaxing tone asked her if she had a copper to give a poor man.
    1.11 -- Book 1 Chapter 11 -- Maggie Tries to Run away from Her Shadow (10% in)
  • The days were gone when people could be greatly wrought upon by their faith, still less change it; the Catholics were formidable because they would lay hold of government and property, and burn men alive; not because any sane and honest parishioner of St. Ogg's could be brought to believe in the Pope.
    1.12 -- Book 1 Chapter 12 -- Mr. and Mrs. Glegg at Home (26% in)
  • If you think a lad of thirteen would have been so childish, you must be an exceptionally wise man, who, although you are devoted to a civil calling, requiring you to look bland rather than formidable, yet never, since you had a beard, threw yourself into a martial attitude, and frowned before the looking-glass.
    2.4 -- Book 2 Chapter 4 -- "The Young Idea" (99% in)
  • Dissatisfied with the pacific aspect of a face which had no more than the faintest hint of flaxen eyebrow, together with a pair of amiable blue-gray eyes and round pink cheeks that refused to look formidable, let him frown as he would before the looking-glass (Philip had once told him of a man who had a horseshoe frown, and Tom had tried with all his frowning might to make a horseshoe on his forehead), he had had recourse to that unfailing source of the terrible, burnt cork, and had...
    2.5 -- Book 2 Chapter 5 -- Maggie's Second Visit (67% in)
  • "Well, sir, yes," said Mrs. Tulliver, beginning to feel alarmed at her own courage, now she was really in presence of the formidable man, and reflecting that she had not settled with herself how she should begin.
    3.7 -- Book 3 Chapter 7 -- How a Hen Takes to Stratagem (47% in)

There are no more uses of "formidable" in The Mill on the Floss.

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