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devise
used in The Count of Monte Cristo

5 uses
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Definition
to come up with a way of doing something — typically a creative idea or plan
  • But in vain did he rack his imagination; fertile as it was, he could not devise any plan for reaching the island without companionship.
    Chapters 22-23 (94% in)
  • 'Why,' said he, 'does not the emperor, who has devised so many clever and efficient modes of improving the art of war, organize a regiment of lawyers, judges and legal practitioners, sending them in the hottest fire the enemy could maintain, and using them to save better men?'
    Chapters 51-52 (37% in)
  • During the six years which had passed since Noirtier first fell into this sad state, Valentine's powers of invention had been too often put to the test not to render her expert in devising expedients for gaining a knowledge of his wishes, and the constant practice had so perfected her in the art that she guessed the old man's meaning as quickly as if he himself had been able to seek for what he wanted.
    Chapters 57-58 (94% in)
  • "Oh, that coat is not his own idea; it is the Republic's, which deputed David [*] to devise a uniform for the Academicians."
    Chapters 69-70 (80% in)
  • But since you abuse my confidence, since you have devised a new torture after I thought I had exhausted them all, then, Count of Monte Cristo my pretended benefactor—then, Count of Monte Cristo, the universal guardian, be satisfied, you shall witness the death of your friend;" and Morrel, with a maniacal laugh, again rushed towards the pistols.
    Chapters 105-106 (23% in)

There are no more uses of "devise" in The Count of Monte Cristo.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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