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fastidious
used in The Count of Monte Cristo

5 uses
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Definition
giving careful attention to detail

or:

excessively concerned with cleanliness or matters of taste
  • It was evident, from her figure and the perfumes she had about her, that she was young and fastidious in her tastes, but that was all.
    Chapters 85-86 (76% in)
fastidious = concerned with matters of good taste
  • The count appeared, dressed with the greatest simplicity, but the most fastidious dandy could have found nothing to cavil at in his toilet.
    Chapters 39-40 (56% in)
  • And, indeed, it required but one glance at Mademoiselle Danglars to comprehend the justness of Morcerf's remark—she was beautiful, but her beauty was of too marked and decided a character to please a fastidious taste; her hair was raven black, but its natural waves seemed somewhat rebellious; her eyes, of the same color as her hair, were surmounted by well-arched brows, whose great defect, however, consisted in an almost habitual frown, while her whole physiognomy wore that expression...
    Chapters 53-54 (13% in)
  • As regarded her attainments, the only fault to be found with them was the same that a fastidious connoisseur might have found with her beauty, that they were somewhat too erudite and masculine for so young a person.
    Chapters 53-54 (15% in)
  • "You are fastidious, Chateau-Renaud," replied Debray; "those clothes are well cut and quite new."
    Chapters 61-62 (86% in)

There are no more uses of "fastidious" in The Count of Monte Cristo.

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