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capricious
used in The Count of Monte Cristo

24 uses
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Definition
impulsive or unpredictable or tending to make sudden changes — especially impulsive behavior
  • but it is ridiculous thus to yield to the caprices of an old man, and I shall, therefore, act according to my conscience.
    Chapters 59-60 (45% in)
caprices = impulsive acts
  • Beside his taste for the fine arts, which Luigi had carried as far as he could in his solitude, he was given to alternating fits of sadness and enthusiasm, was often angry and capricious, and always sarcastic.
    Chapters 33-34 (14% in)
  • I am a very capricious being, and I should tell you that sometimes when I rise, or after my dinner, or in the middle of the night, I resolve on starting for some particular point, and away I go.
    Chapters 37-38 (33% in)
  • There were collected and piled up all Albert's successive caprices, hunting-horns, bass-viols, flutes—a whole orchestra, for Albert had had not a taste but a fancy for music; easels, palettes, brushes, pencils—for music had been succeeded by painting; foils, boxing-gloves, broadswords, and single-sticks—for, following the example of the fashionable young men of the time, Albert de Morcerf cultivated, with far more perseverance than music and drawing, the three arts that complete a...
    Chapters 39-40 (6% in)
  • ...the scale from Maryland and Porto-Rico, to Latakia,—was exposed in pots of crackled earthenware of which the Dutch are so fond; beside them, in boxes of fragrant wood, were ranged, according to their size and quality, pueros, regalias, havanas, and manillas; and, in an open cabinet, a collection of German pipes, of chibouques, with their amber mouth-pieces ornamented with coral, and of narghiles, with their long tubes of morocco, awaiting the caprice or the sympathy of the smokers.
    Chapters 39-40 (10% in)
  • "I had announced you beforehand to my friends as an enchanter of the 'Arabian Nights,' a wizard of the Middle Ages; but the Parisians are so subtle in paradoxes that they mistake for caprices of the imagination the most incontestable truths, when these truths do not form a part of their daily existence.
    Chapters 39-40 (70% in)
  • He knows my tastes, my caprices, my wants.
    Chapters 39-40 (93% in)
  • The boy triumphed, and this victory rendered him so audacious, that all the money of Assunta, whose affection for him seemed to increase as he became more unworthy of it, was spent in caprices she knew not how to contend against, and follies she had not the courage to prevent.
    Chapters 43-44 (64% in)
  • So the master of Monte Cristo gives himself airs befitting a great millionaire or a capricious beauty.
    Chapters 45-46 (75% in)
  • To Danglars Monte Cristo also wrote, requesting him to excuse the whimsical gift of a capricious millionaire, and to beg the baroness to pardon the Eastern fashion adopted in the return of the horses.
    Chapters 47-48 (23% in)
  • His first movement was to free himself by a violent push from the encircling arms of his mother, and to rush forward to the casket from whence the count had taken the phial of elixir; then, without asking permission of any one, he proceeded, in all the wilfulness of a spoiled child unaccustomed to restrain either whims or caprices, to pull the corks out of all the bottles.
    Chapters 47-48 (40% in)
  • There are as many elixirs of every kind as there are caprices and peculiarities in the physical and moral nature of humanity; and I will say further—the art of these chemists is capable with the utmost precision to accommodate and proportion the remedy and the bane to yearnings for love or desires for vengeance.
    Chapters 51-52 (70% in)
  • "It is an old man's caprice."
    Chapters 59-60 (55% in)
  • Nevertheless, it is necessary that my will should be respected in my family, and that the folly of an old man and the caprice of a child should not be allowed to overturn a project which I have entertained for so many years.
    Chapters 59-60 (57% in)
  • It would be ridiculous in me to regulate my conduct by such caprices.
    Chapters 59-60 (61% in)
  • Doubtless he is capricious, but that is all; one thing alone struck me,—of all the exquisite things he placed before us, he touched nothing.
    Chapters 67-68 (60% in)
  • Then began his travels, his duels, his caprices; then the insurrection in Greece broke out, and he had served in the Grecian ranks.
    Chapters 69-70 (40% in)
  • The fortune of war, my dear viscount,—the caprice of fortune; that is the way in which these things are to be accounted for.
    Chapters 77-78 (9% in)
  • At other times in spite of maternal endearments or threats, I had with a child's caprice been accustomed to indulge my feelings of sorrow or anger by crying as much as I felt inclined; but on this occasion there was an intonation of such extreme terror in my mother's voice when she enjoined me to silence, that I ceased crying as soon as her command was given.
    Chapters 77-78 (24% in)
  • And do you really flatter yourself that I shall yield to all your caprices, and quietly and humbly await the time of again being received into your good graces?
    Chapters 77-78 (69% in)
  • The baron might possibly have perceived it, but, attributing it to a caprice, feigned ignorance.
    Chapters 83-84 (58% in)
  • My wish was not to confine myself to domestic cares, or the caprices of any man, but to be an artist, and consequently free in heart, in person, and in thought.
    Chapters 93-94 (24% in)
  • He was about to marry her, when one of the caprices of fate,—which would almost make us doubt the goodness of providence, if that providence did not afterwards reveal itself by proving that all is but a means of conducting to an end,—one of those caprices deprived him of his mistress, of the future of which he had dreamed (for in his blindness he forgot he could only read the present), and cast him into a dungeon.
    Chapters 113-114 (45% in)
  • He was about to marry her, when one of the caprices of fate,—which would almost make us doubt the goodness of providence, if that providence did not afterwards reveal itself by proving that all is but a means of conducting to an end,—one of those caprices deprived him of his mistress, of the future of which he had dreamed (for in his blindness he forgot he could only read the present), and cast him into a dungeon.
    Chapters 113-114 (46% in)

There are no more uses of "capricious" in The Count of Monte Cristo.

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