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appease
used in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

3 uses
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Definition
satisfy or pacify (make less angry or upset) — typically by giving something wanted
  • They tried to argue it away by reminding conscience that they had purloined sweetmeats and apples scores of times; but conscience was not to be appeased by such thin plausibilities; it seemed to them, in the end, that there was no getting around the stubborn fact that taking sweetmeats was only "hooking," while taking bacon and hams and such valuables was plain simple stealing—and there was a command against that in the Bible.
    Chapter 13 (96% in)
  • No—better still, he would join the Indians, and hunt buffaloes and go on the warpath in the mountain ranges and the trackless great plains of the Far West, and away in the future come back a great chief, bristling with feathers, hideous with paint, and prance into Sunday-school, some drowsy summer morning, with a bloodcurdling war-whoop, and sear the eyeballs of all his companions with unappeasable envy.
    Chapter 8 (29% in)
  • Next he rose on his hind feet and pranced around, in a frenzy of enjoyment, with his head over his shoulder and his voice proclaiming his unappeasable happiness.
    Chapter 12 (56% in)

There are no more uses of "appease" in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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