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engage
used in Northanger Abbey

65 uses
  • There was but one obstacle, in short, to be mentioned; but till that one was removed, it must be impossible for them to sanction the engagement.
    Chapter 31 (15% in)
  • But to her utter amazement she found that to proceed along the room was by no means the way to disengage themselves from the crowd; it seemed rather to increase as they went on, whereas she had imagined that when once fairly within the door, they should easily find seats and be able to watch the dances with perfect convenience.
    Chapter 2 (50% in)
  • CHAPTER 5 Catherine was not so much engaged at the theatre that evening, in returning the nods and smiles of Miss Thorpe, though they certainly claimed much of her leisure, as to forget to look with an inquiring eye for Mr. Tilney in every box which her eye could reach; but she looked in vain.
    Chapter 5 (1% in)
  • Now, had the same young lady been engaged with a volume of the Spectator, instead of such a work, how proudly would she have produced the book, and told its name; though the chances must be against her being occupied by any part of that voluminous publication, of which either the matter or manner would not disgust a young person of taste: the substance of its papers so often consisting in the statement of improbable circumstances, unnatural characters, and topics of conversation which...
    Chapter 5 (92% in)
  • Well, I will drive you up Lansdown tomorrow; mind, I am engaged.
    Chapter 7 (51% in)
  • These manners did not please Catherine; but he was James's friend and Isabella's brother; and her judgment was further bought off by Isabella's assuring her, when they withdrew to see the new hat, that John thought her the most charming girl in the world, and by John's engaging her before they parted to dance with him that evening.
    Chapter 7 (76% in)
  • ...older or vainer, such attacks might have done little; but, where youth and diffidence are united, it requires uncommon steadiness of reason to resist the attraction of being called the most charming girl in the world, and of being so very early engaged as a partner; and the consequence was that, when the two Morlands, after sitting an hour with the Thorpes, set off to walk together to Mr. Allen's, and James, as the door was closed on them, said, "Well, Catherine, how do you like my...
    Chapter 7 (78% in)
  • A pre-engagement in Edgar's Buildings prevented his accepting the invitation of one friend, and obliged him to hurry away as soon as he had satisfied the demands of the other.
    Chapter 7 (96% in)
  • The time of the two parties uniting in the Octagon Room being correctly adjusted, Catherine was then left to the luxury of a raised, restless, and frightened imagination over the pages of Udolpho, lost from all worldly concerns of dressing and dinner, incapable of soothing Mrs. Allen's fears on the delay of an expected dressmaker, and having only one minute in sixty to bestow even on the reflection of her own felicity, in being already engaged for the evening.
    Chapter 7 (**% in)
  • The dancing began within a few minutes after they were seated; and James, who had been engaged quite as long as his sister, was very importunate with Isabella to stand up; but John was gone into the card-room to speak to a friend, and nothing, she declared, should induce her to join the set before her dear Catherine could join it too.
    Chapter 8 (5% in)
  • She was separated from all her party, and away from all her acquaintance; one mortification succeeded another, and from the whole she deduced this useful lesson, that to go previously engaged to a ball does not necessarily increase either the dignity or enjoyment of a young lady.
    Chapter 8 (46% in)
  • The rest of the evening she found very dull; Mr. Tilney was drawn away from their party at tea, to attend that of his partner; Miss Tilney, though belonging to it, did not sit near her, and James and Isabella were so much engaged in conversing together that the latter had no leisure to bestow more on her friend than one smile, one squeeze, and one "dearest Catherine."
    Chapter 8 (99% in)
  • Why, you have not forgot our engagement!
    Chapter 9 (15% in)
  • They were always engaged in some sentimental discussion or lively dispute, but their sentiment was conveyed in such whispering voices, and their vivacity attended with so much laughter, that though Catherine's supporting opinion was not unfrequently called for by one or the other, she was never able to give any, from not having heard a word of the subject.
    Chapter 10 (18% in)
  • At length however she was empowered to disengage herself from her friend, by the avowed necessity of speaking to Miss Tilney, whom she most joyfully saw just entering the room with Mrs. Hughes, and whom she instantly joined, with a firmer determination to be acquainted, than she might have had courage to command, had she not been urged by the disappointment of the day before.
    Chapter 10 (20% in)
  • He must have thought it very odd to hear me say I was engaged the other evening, when he saw me sitting down.
    Chapter 10 (25% in)
  • But I really had been engaged the whole day to Mr. Thorpe.
    Chapter 10 (26% in)
  • He came only to engage lodgings for us.
    Chapter 10 (27% in)
  • She had then been exulting in her engagement to Thorpe, and was now chiefly anxious to avoid his sight, lest he should engage her again; for though she could not, dared not expect that Mr. Tilney should ask her a third time to dance, her wishes, hopes, and plans all centred in nothing less.
    Chapter 10 (40% in)
  • She had then been exulting in her engagement to Thorpe, and was now chiefly anxious to avoid his sight, lest he should engage her again; for though she could not, dared not expect that Mr. Tilney should ask her a third time to dance, her wishes, hopes, and plans all centred in nothing less.
    Chapter 10 (40% in)
  • I only came for the sake of dancing with you, and I firmly believe you were engaged to me ever since Monday.
    Chapter 10 (53% in)
  • You will allow, that in both, man has the advantage of choice, woman only the power of refusal; that in both, it is an engagement between man and woman, formed for the advantage of each; and that when once entered into, they belong exclusively to each other till the moment of its dissolution; that it is their duty, each to endeavour to give the other no cause for wishing that he or she had bestowed themselves elsewhere, and their best interest to keep their own imaginations from...
    Chapter 10 (65% in)
  • But, however, I cannot go with you today, because I am engaged; I expect some friends every moment.
    Chapter 11 (26% in)
  • She could not think the Tilneys had acted quite well by her, in so readily giving up their engagement, without sending her any message of excuse.
    Chapter 11 (49% in)
  • While talking to each other, she had observed with some surprise that John Thorpe, who was never in the same part of the house for ten minutes together, was engaged in conversation with General Tilney; and she felt something more than surprise when she thought she could perceive herself the object of their attention and discourse.
    Chapter 12 (76% in)
  • The engagement which ought to have kept her from joining in the former attempt would make it impossible for her to accompany them now.
    Chapter 13 (7% in)
  • I am engaged to Miss Tilney.
    Chapter 13 (10% in)
  • It would be so easy to tell Miss Tilney that you had just been reminded of a prior engagement, and must only beg to put off the walk till Tuesday.
    Chapter 13 (12% in)
  • There has been no prior engagement.
    Chapter 13 (13% in)
  • Told her you had sent me to say that, having just recollected a prior engagement of going to Clifton with us tomorrow, you could not have the pleasure of walking with her till Tuesday.
    Chapter 13 (38% in)
  • Setting her own inclination apart, to have failed a second time in her engagement to Miss Tilney, to have retracted a promise voluntarily made only five minutes before, and on a false pretence too, must have been wrong.
    Chapter 13 (52% in)
  • No; I had just engaged myself to walk with Miss Tilney before they told me of it; and therefore you know I could not go with them, could I?
    Chapter 13 (80% in)
  • The Tilneys called for her at the appointed time; and no new difficulty arising, no sudden recollection, no unexpected summons, no impertinent intrusion to disconcert their measures, my heroine was most unnaturally able to fulfil her engagement, though it was made with the hero himself.
    Chapter 14 (3% in)
  • If we proceed to particulars, and engage in the never-ceasing inquiry of 'Have you read this?' and 'Have you read that?'
    Chapter 14 (15% in)
  • The Tilneys were soon engaged in another on which she had nothing to say.
    Chapter 14 (46% in)
  • Isabella now entered the room with so eager a step, and a look of such happy importance, as engaged all her friend's notice.
    Chapter 15 (12% in)
  • Her heart and faith were alike engaged to James.
    Chapter 15 (20% in)
  • Her brother and her friend engaged!
    Chapter 15 (20% in)
  • Mrs. Thorpe and her son, who were acquainted with everything, and who seemed only to want Mr. Morland's consent, to consider Isabella's engagement as the most fortunate circumstance imaginable for their family, were allowed to join their counsels, and add their quota of significant looks and mysterious expressions to fill up the measure of curiosity to be raised in the unprivileged younger sisters.
    Chapter 15 (54% in)
  • The agitation which she had herself experienced on first learning her brother's engagement made her expect to raise no inconsiderable emotion in Mr. and Mrs. Allen, by the communication of the wonderful event.
    Chapter 15 (94% in)
  • Amusing enough, if my mind had been disengaged; but I would have given the world to sit still.
    Chapter 16 (65% in)
  • Once or twice indeed, since James's engagement had taught her what could be done, she had got so far as to indulge in a secret "perhaps," but in general the felicity of being with him for the present bounded her views: the present was now comprised in another three weeks, and her happiness being certain for that period, the rest of her life was at such a distance as to excite but little interest.
    Chapter 17 (8% in)
  • "My dearest Catherine," continued the other without at all listening to her, "I would not for all the world be the means of hurrying you into an engagement before you knew what you were about.
    Chapter 18 (62% in)
  • It seemed to her that Captain Tilney was falling in love with Isabella, and Isabella unconsciously encouraging him; unconsciously it must be, for Isabella's attachment to James was as certain and well acknowledged as her engagement.
    Chapter 18 (88% in)
  • Though his looks did not please her, his name was a passport to her goodwill, and she thought with sincere compassion of his approaching disappointment; for, in spite of what she had believed herself to overhear in the pump-room, his behaviour was so incompatible with a knowledge of Isabella's engagement that she could not, upon reflection, imagine him aware of it.
    Chapter 19 (20% in)
  • She spoke to Henry Tilney on the subject, regretting his brother's evident partiality for Miss Thorpe, and entreating him to make known her prior engagement.
    Chapter 19 (32% in)
  • I have myself told him that Miss Thorpe is engaged.
    Chapter 19 (41% in)
  • If he knows her engagement, what can he mean by his behaviour?
    Chapter 19 (58% in)
  • My brother is a lively and perhaps sometimes a thoughtless young man; he has had about a week's acquaintance with your friend, and he has known her engagement almost as long as he has known her."
    Chapter 19 (66% in)
  • Perhaps it may seem odd, that with only two younger children, I should think any profession necessary for him; and certainly there are moments when we could all wish him disengaged from every tie of business.
    Chapter 22 (42% in)
  • I wish your visit at Northanger may be over before Captain Tilney makes his engagement known, or you will be uncomfortably circumstanced.
    Chapter 25 (42% in)
  • A girl who, before his eyes, is violating an engagement voluntarily entered into with another man!
    Chapter 25 (82% in)
  • Sometimes it appeared to them as if his silence would be the natural result of the suspected engagement, and at others that it was wholly incompatible with it.
    Chapter 26 (18% in)
  • At the further end of the village, and tolerably disengaged from the rest of it, stood the parsonage, a new-built substantial stone house, with its semicircular sweep and green gates; and, as they drove up to the door, Henry, with the friends of his solitude, a large Newfoundland puppy and two or three terriers, was ready to receive and make much of them.
    Chapter 26 (66% in)
  • Henry was not able to obey his father's injunction of remaining wholly at Northanger in attendance on the ladies, during his absence in London, the engagements of his curate at Woodston obliging him to leave them on Saturday for a couple of nights.
    Chapter 28 (18% in)
  • My father has recollected an engagement that takes our whole family away on Monday.
    Chapter 28 (41% in)
  • A second engagement must give way to a first.
    Chapter 28 (43% in)
  • An engagement, you know, must be kept.
    Chapter 28 (58% in)
  • The pressing anxieties of thought, which prevented her from noticing anything before her, when once beyond the neighbourhood of Woodston, saved her at the same time from watching her progress; and though no object on the road could engage a moment's attention, she found no stage of it tedious.
    Chapter 29 (18% in)
  • "I can allow for his wishing Catherine away, when he recollected this engagement," said Sarah, "but why not do it civilly?"
    Chapter 29 (49% in)
  • "We are sorry for him," said she; "but otherwise there is no harm done in the match going off; for it could not be a desirable thing to have him engaged to a girl whom we had not the smallest acquaintance with, and who was so entirely without fortune; and now, after such behaviour, we cannot think at all well of her.
    Chapter 29 (73% in)
  • The affrighted Catherine, amidst all the terrors of expectation, as she listened to this account, could not but rejoice in the kind caution with which Henry had saved her from the necessity of a conscientious rejection, by engaging her faith before he mentioned the subject; and as he proceeded to give the particulars, and explain the motives of his father's conduct, her feelings soon hardened into even a triumphant delight.
    Chapter 30 (50% in)
  • Thorpe, most happy to be on speaking terms with a man of General Tilney's importance, had been joyfully and proudly communicative; and being at that time not only in daily expectation of Morland's engaging Isabella, but likewise pretty well resolved upon marrying Catherine himself, his vanity induced him to represent the family as yet more wealthy than his vanity and avarice had made him believe them.
    Chapter 30 (58% in)
  • Henry and Eleanor, perceiving nothing in her situation likely to engage their father's particular respect, had seen with astonishment the suddenness, continuance, and extent of his attention; and though latterly, from some hints which had accompanied an almost positive command to his son of doing everything in his power to attach her, Henry was convinced of his father's believing it to be an advantageous connection, it was not till the late explanation at Northanger that they had the...
    Chapter 30 (72% in)
  • He steadily refused to accompany his father into Herefordshire, an engagement formed almost at the moment to promote the dismissal of Catherine, and as steadily declared his intention of offering her his hand.
    Chapter 30 (97% in)

There are no more uses of "engage" in Northanger Abbey.

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