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felicity
used in Northanger Abbey

10 uses
  • —it did not appear to her that life could supply any greater felicity.
    Chapter 10 (50% in)
  • The time of the two parties uniting in the Octagon Room being correctly adjusted, Catherine was then left to the luxury of a raised, restless, and frightened imagination over the pages of Udolpho, lost from all worldly concerns of dressing and dinner, incapable of soothing Mrs. Allen's fears on the delay of an expected dressmaker, and having only one minute in sixty to bestow even on the reflection of her own felicity, in being already engaged for the evening.
    Chapter 7 (**% in)
  • In chatting with Miss Tilney before the evening concluded, a new source of felicity arose to her.
    Chapter 10 (95% in)
  • It was "dear John" and "dear Catherine" at every word; "dear Anne and dear Maria" must immediately be made sharers in their felicity; and two "dears" at once before the name of Isabella were not more than that beloved child had now well earned.
    Chapter 15 (64% in)
  • The letter, whence sprang all this felicity, was short, containing little more than this assurance of success; and every particular was deferred till James could write again.
    Chapter 15 (66% in)
  • She knew enough to feel secure of an honourable and speedy establishment, and her imagination took a rapid flight over its attendant felicities.
    Chapter 15 (70% in)
  • Once or twice indeed, since James's engagement had taught her what could be done, she had got so far as to indulge in a secret "perhaps," but in general the felicity of being with him for the present bounded her views: the present was now comprised in another three weeks, and her happiness being certain for that period, the rest of her life was at such a distance as to excite but little interest.
    Chapter 17 (10% in)
  • The anxiety, which in this state of their attachment must be the portion of Henry and Catherine, and of all who loved either, as to its final event, can hardly extend, I fear, to the bosom of my readers, who will see in the tell-tale compression of the pages before them, that we are all hastening together to perfect felicity.
    Chapter 31 (43% in)
  • I know no one more entitled, by unpretending merit, or better prepared by habitual suffering, to receive and enjoy felicity.
    Chapter 31 (57% in)
  • To begin perfect happiness at the respective ages of twenty-six and eighteen is to do pretty well; and professing myself moreover convinced that the general's unjust interference, so far from being really injurious to their felicity, was perhaps rather conducive to it, by improving their knowledge of each other, and adding strength to their attachment, I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny,...
    Chapter 31 (95% in)

There are no more uses of "felicity" in Northanger Abbey.

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