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nihilism
used in Anna Karenina

5 uses
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Definition
the belief that there is no universal truth or underlying reality that undergirds moral values, and that ultimately existence is meaningless
  • But now we know that these little pills of classical learning possess the medicinal property of anti-nihilism, and we boldly prescribe them to our patients....
    Part Four (42% in)
  • "But," said Sergey Ivanovitch, smiling subtly, and addressing Karenin, "One must allow that to weigh all the advantages and disadvantages of classical and scientific studies is a difficult task, and the question which form of education was to be preferred would not have been so quickly and conclusively decided if there had not been in favor of classical education, as you expressed it just now, its moral—disons le mot—anti-nihilist influence."
    Part Four (42% in)
  • "If it had not been for the distinctive property of anti-nihilistic influence on the side of classical studies, we should have considered the subject more, have weighed the arguments on both sides," said Sergey Ivanovitch with a subtle smile, "we should have given elbow-room to both tendencies.
    Part Four (42% in)
  • "You're a pretty fellow!" said Stepan Arkadyevitch laughing, "and you call me a Nihilist!
    Part Five (1% in)
  • Then the doctor, a young man, not quite a Nihilist perhaps, but you know, eats with his knife.... but a very good doctor.
    Part Six (58% in)

There are no more uses of "nihilism" in Anna Karenina.

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