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despondent
used in Anna Karenina

6 uses
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Definition
emotionally depressed — especially a feeling of grief and hopelessness after a loss
  • "Oh, I'll send, to be sure," said Vassily Fedorovitch despondently.
    Part Two (33% in)
  • But still he had that look Levin knew so well that always irritated him, a look of hopelessness and despondency.
    Part Two (32% in)
  • When the peasants, with their singing, had vanished out of sight and hearing, a weary feeling of despondency at his own isolation, his physical inactivity, his alienation from this world, came over Levin.
    Part Three (33% in)
  • But as for the proposal made by Levin—to take a part as shareholder with his laborers in each agricultural undertaking— at this the bailiff simply expressed a profound despondency, and offered no definite opinion, but began immediately talking of the urgent necessity of carrying the remaining sheaves of rye the next day, and of sending the men out for the second ploughing, so that Levin felt that this was not the time for discussing it.
    Part Three (89% in)
  • Alexey Alexandrovitch sat down, and with a despondent and suffering face watched the nurse walking to and fro.
    Part Four (83% in)
  • For a minute he was still, and with the same despondent face gazed at the baby; but all at once a smile, that moved his hair and the skin of his forehead, came out on his face, and he went as softly out of the room.
    Part Four (83% in)

There are no more uses of "despondent" in Anna Karenina.

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