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reflect
used in War and Peace

44 uses
  • But only what was really good in him was reflected in his wife, all that was not quite good was rejected.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (58% in)
  • "Attendez," said Anna Pavlovna, reflecting, "I'll speak to Lise, young Bolkonski's wife, this very evening, and perhaps the thing can be arranged.
    Book One — 1805 (4% in)
  • That smile was immediately reflected on Pierre's face.
    Book One — 1805 (24% in)
  • The countess reflected a moment and took a pinch from a gold snuffbox with her husband's portrait on it.
    Book One — 1805 (31% in)
  • "Bring me...." he reflected a moment, "yes, bring me seven hundred rubles, yes!
    Book One — 1805 (50% in)
  • He now approached the sick man with the noiseless step of one in full vigor of life, with his delicate white fingers raised from the green quilt the hand that was free, and turning sideways felt the pulse and reflected a moment.
    Book One — 1805 (73% in)
  • It reflected a weak, ungraceful figure and thin face.
    Book One — 1805 (82% in)
  • And the latter—unconscious that he was being reflected in the hussar officer as in a looking glass—started, moved forward, and answered: "Highly satisfied, your excellency!"
    Book Two — 1805 (6% in)
  • The soldiers, for the most part handsome fellows and, as is always the case in an artillery company, a head and shoulders taller and twice as broad as their officer—all looked at their commander like children in an embarrassing situation, and the expression on his face was invariably reflected on theirs.
    Book Two — 1805 (91% in)
  • It's bad...." he reflected, but while he was thinking this (the reflection was still incomplete), he caught himself smiling and was conscious that another line of thought had sprung up, and while thinking of her worthlessness he was also dreaming of how she would be his wife, how she would love him become quite different, and how all he had thought and heard of her might be false.
    Book Three — 1805 (7% in)
  • "It is all very well for Rostov, whose father sends him ten thousand rubles at a time, to talk about not wishing to cringe to anybody and not be anyone's lackey, but I who have nothing but my brains have to make a career and must not miss opportunities, but must avail myself of them!" he reflected.
    Book Three — 1805 (50% in)
  • "But be that what it may," he reflected, "there is no riding round it now.
    Book Three — 1805 (90% in)
  • Without undressing, he lay down on the leather sofa in front of a round table, put his big feet in their overboots on the table, and began to reflect.
    Book Five — 1806-07 (0% in)
  • Prince Andrew expressed his ideas so clearly and distinctly that it was evident he had reflected on this subject more than once, and he spoke readily and rapidly like a man who has not talked for a long time.
    Book Five — 1806-07 (54% in)
  • The look of annoyance had already disappeared from Boris' face: having evidently reflected and decided how to act, he very quietly took both Rostov's hands and led him into the next room.
    Book Five — 1806-07 (88% in)
  • It is not enough for me to know what I have in me—everyone must know it: Pierre, and that young girl who wanted to fly away into the sky, everyone must know me, so that my life may not be lived for myself alone while others live so apart from it, but so that it may be reflected in them all, and they and I may live in harmony!
    Book Six — 1808-10 (7% in)
  • And Prince Andrew, crossing his arms behind him, long paced the room, now frowning, now smiling, as he reflected on those irrational, inexpressible thoughts, secret as a crime, which altered his whole life and were connected with Pierre, with fame, with the girl at the window, the oak, and woman's beauty and love.
    Book Six — 1808-10 (8% in)
  • The mirrors on the landing reflected ladies in white, pale-blue, and pink dresses, with diamonds and pearls on their bare necks and arms.
    Book Six — 1808-10 (55% in)
  • Berg smiled with a sense of his superiority over a weak woman, and paused, reflecting that this dear wife of his was after all but a weak woman who could not understand all that constitutes a man's dignity, what it was ein Mann zu sein.
    Book Six — 1808-10 (72% in)
  • Difficult and strange as it was for him to reflect that he would go away without having heard from the staff—and this interested him extremely—whether he was promoted to a captaincy or would receive the Order of St. Anne for the last maneuvers; strange as it was to think that he would go away without having sold his three roans to the Polish Count Golukhovski, who was bargaining for the horses Rostov had betted he would sell for two thousand rubles; incomprehensible as it seemed that...
    Book Seven — 1810-11 (3% in)
  • It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
    Book Seven — 1810-11 (79% in)
  • She sat a long time looking at the receding line of candles reflected in the glasses and expecting (from tales she had heard) to see a coffin, or him, Prince Andrew, in that last dim, indistinctly outlined square.
    Book Seven — 1810-11 (93% in)
  • What is going on in the world?" he would ask himself in perplexity several times a day, involuntarily beginning to reflect anew on the meaning of the phenomena of life; but knowing by experience that there were no answers to these questions he made haste to turn away from them, and took up a book, or hurried of to the Club or to Apollon Nikolaevich's, to exchange the gossip of the town.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (3% in)
  • But the visitors did not reflect that besides the couple of hours during which they saw their host, there were also twenty-two hours in the day during which the private and intimate life of the house continued.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (7% in)
  • "They are all alike!" he said to himself, reflecting that he was not the only man unfortunate enough to be tied to a bad woman.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (85% in)
  • He acted as he did when hunting, without reflecting or considering.
    Book Nine — 1812 (63% in)
  • It comforted her to reflect that she was not better as she had formerly imagined, but worse, much worse, than anybody else in the world.
    Book Nine — 1812 (69% in)
  • The smoke of the guns mingled with this mist, and over the whole expanse and through that mist the rays of the morning sun were reflected, flashing back like lightning from the water, from the dew, and from the bayonets of the troops crowded together by the riverbanks and in Borodino.
    Book Ten — 1812 (78% in)
  • Kutuzov seemed to reflect, searching for an example, then with a clear, naive look at Bennigsen he added: "Oh yes; take the battle of Friedland, which I think the count well remembers, and which was.... not fully successful, only because our troops were rearranged too near the enemy...."
    Book Eleven — 1812 (9% in)
  • "Here she is, the reward for all those fainthearted men," he reflected, glancing at those near him and at the troops who were approaching and forming up.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (46% in)
  • Pierre did not allow himself to reflect on what lay before him, but hastened to act.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (92% in)
  • It is very difficult for events to be reflected in their real strength and completeness amid the conditions of court life and far from the scene of action.
    Book Twelve — 1812 (7% in)
  • When he had finished that business it was already too late to go anywhere but still too early to go to bed, and for a long time he paced up and down the room, reflecting on his life, a thing he rarely did.
    Book Twelve — 1812 (37% in)
  • He reflected for a moment.
    Book Twelve — 1812 (56% in)
  • God is in the midst, and each drop tries to expand so as to reflect Him to the greatest extent.
    Book Fourteen — 1812 (79% in)
  • Pierre's confusion was not reflected by any confusion on Natasha's part, but only by the pleasure that just perceptibly lit up her whole face.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (28% in)
  • "Oh, yes, long ago before this happened I did for some reason mean to go to Petersburg," he reflected.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (32% in)
  • Pierre reflected.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (33% in)
  • "Can she have loved my brother so little as to be able to forget him so soon?" she thought when she reflected on the change.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (36% in)
  • The historical figures at the head of armies, who formerly reflected the movement of the masses by ordering wars, campaigns, and battles, now reflected the restless movement by political and diplomatic combinations, laws, and treaties.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (37% in)
  • The historical figures at the head of armies, who formerly reflected the movement of the masses by ordering wars, campaigns, and battles, now reflected the restless movement by political and diplomatic combinations, laws, and treaties.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (37% in)
  • After seven years of marriage Pierre had the joyous and firm consciousness that he was not a bad man, and he felt this because he saw himself reflected in his wife.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (58% in)
  • The man who worked most with his hands could not think so much about what he was doing, or reflect on or command what would result from the common activity; while the man who commanded more would evidently work less with his hands on account of his greater verbal activity.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (87% in)
  • If I reflect on an action still more remote, ten years ago or more, then the consequences of my action are still plainer to me and I find it hard to imagine what would have happened had that action not been performed.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (93% in)

There are no more uses of "reflect" in War and Peace.

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