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opera
used in War and Peace

8 uses
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Definition
a musical play with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung — (typically associated with classical music and often in a language foreign to the audience)

or:

the art form (or describing something as related to it) that consists of musical plays with orchestra in which most dialogue is sung
  • That evening the Rostovs went to the Opera, for which Marya Dmitrievna had taken a box.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (35% in)
  • She hummed a scrap from her favorite opera by Cherubini, threw herself on her bed, laughed at the pleasant thought that she would immediately fall asleep, called Dunyasha the maid to put out the candle, and before Dunyasha had left the room had already passed into yet another happier world of dreams, where everything was as light and beautiful as in reality, and even more so because it was different.
    Book Six — 1808-10 (49% in)
  • Having as it were reviewed her kingdom, tested her power, and made sure that everyone was submissive, but that all the same it was dull, Natasha betook herself to the ballroom, picked up her guitar, sat down in a dark corner behind a bookcase, and began to run her fingers over the strings in the bass, picking out a passage she recalled from an opera she had heard in Petersburg with Prince Andrew.
    Book Seven — 1810-11 (67% in)
  • She could not follow the opera nor even listen to the music; she saw only the painted cardboard and the queerly dressed men and women who moved, spoke, and sang so strangely in that brilliant light.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (40% in)
  • Only after she had reached home was Natasha able clearly to think over what had happened to her, and suddenly remembering Prince Andrew she was horrified, and at tea to which all had sat down after the opera, she gave a loud exclamation, flushed, and ran out of the room.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (49% in)
  • At supper after the opera he described to Dolokhov with the air of a connoisseur the attractions of her arms, shoulders, feet, and hair and expressed his intention of making love to her.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (52% in)
  • The day after the opera the Rostovs went nowhere and nobody came to see them.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (53% in)
  • As soon as she saw him she was seized by the same feeling she had had at the opera—gratified vanity at his admiration of her and fear at the absence of a moral barrier between them.
    Book Eight — 1811-12 (57% in)

There are no more uses of "opera" in War and Peace.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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