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grandeur
used in War and Peace

11 uses
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Definition
the quality of being grand or magnificent or splendid
  • In 1808 the Emperor Alexander went to Erfurt for a fresh interview with the Emperor Napoleon, and in the upper circles of Petersburg there was much talk of the grandeur of this important meeting.
    Book Five — 1806-07 (99% in)
  • "The day before yesterday it was 'Napoleon, France, bravoure'; yesterday, 'Alexandre, Russie, grandeur.'
    Book Five — 1806-07 (97% in)
  • ...wrongs, the movement of troops into Prussia—undertaken (as it seemed to Napoleon) only for the purpose of securing an armed peace, the French Emperor's love and habit of war coinciding with his people's inclinations, allurement by the grandeur of the preparations, and the expenditure on those preparations and the need of obtaining advantages to compensate for that expenditure, the intoxicating honors he received in Dresden, the diplomatic negotiations which, in the opinion of...
    Book Nine — 1812 (4% in)
  • He felt that what he now said and did would be historical, and it seemed to him that it would now be best for him—whose grandeur enabled his son to play stick and ball with the terrestrial globe—to show, in contrast to that grandeur, the simplest paternal tenderness.
    Book Ten — 1812 (71% in)
  • He felt that what he now said and did would be historical, and it seemed to him that it would now be best for him—whose grandeur enabled his son to play stick and ball with the terrestrial globe—to show, in contrast to that grandeur, the simplest paternal tenderness.
    Book Ten — 1812 (71% in)
  • I could not resist the sight of the grandeur and glory with which he has covered France.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (78% in)
  • We do not know for certain in how far his genius was genuine in Egypt—where forty centuries looked down upon his grandeur—for his great exploits there are all told us by Frenchmen.
    Book Thirteen — 1812 (35% in)
  • This ideal of glory and grandeur—which consists not merely in considering nothing wrong that one does but in priding oneself on every crime one commits, ascribing to it an incomprehensible supernatural significance—that ideal, destined to guide this man and his associates, had scope for its development in Africa.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (40% in)
  • He alone—with his ideal of glory and grandeur developed in Italy and Egypt, his insane self-adulation, his boldness in crime and frankness in lying—he alone could justify what had to be done.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (41% in)
  • Chance and genius give him the victory at Austerlitz; and by chance all men, not only the French but all Europe—except England which does not take part in the events about to happen—despite their former horror and detestation of his crimes, now recognize his authority, the title he has given himself, and his ideal of grandeur and glory, which seems excellent and reasonable to them all.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (41% in)
  • The discredited rulers of the world can oppose no reasonable ideal to the insensate Napoleonic ideal of glory and grandeur.
    Book Fifteen — 1812-13 (41% in)

There are no more uses of "grandeur" in War and Peace.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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