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patronize
used in War and Peace

4 uses
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Definition
treat in a manner that demonstrates a sense of superiority, but is supposed to seem kind

or:

the actions of a patron (to support someone or something; or to be a customer)
  • He spoke in that refined French in which our grandfathers not only spoke but thought, and with the gentle, patronizing intonation natural to a man of importance who had grown old in society and at court.
    Book One — 1805 (1% in)
  • Pierre who had been regarded with patronizing condescension when he was an illegitimate son, and petted and extolled when he was the best match in Russia, had sunk greatly in the esteem of society after his marriage—when the marriageable daughters and their mothers had nothing to hope from him—especially as he did not know how, and did not wish, to court society's favor.
    Book Five — 1806-07 (25% in)
  • The whole plan of our order should be based on the idea of preparing men of firmness and virtue bound together by unity of conviction—aiming at the punishment of vice and folly, and patronizing talent and virtue: raising worthy men from the dust and attaching them to our Brotherhood.
    Book Six — 1808-10 (25% in)
  • It was not that Moscow had been taken or that the happy conquerors were masters in it and were patronizing him.
    Book Eleven — 1812 (79% in)

There are no more uses of "patronize" in War and Peace.

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