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thus
used in Gulliver's Travels

37 uses
  • While we were thus engaged, I observed a cow passing by, whereupon I pointed to her, and expressed a desire to go and milk her.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (13% in)
  • Thus much I thought proper to tell you in relation to yourself, and to the trust I reposed in you.
    Introductory Sections (46% in)
  • Nine hundred of the strongest men were employed to draw up these cords, by many pulleys fastened on the poles; and thus, in less than three hours, I was raised and slung into the engine, and there tied fast.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (14% in)
  • "Having thus, in obedience to your majesty's commands, diligently searched all his pockets, we observed a girdle about his waist made of the hide of some prodigious animal, from which, on the left side, hung a sword of the length of five men; and on the right, a bag or pouch divided into two cells, each cell capable of holding three of your majesty's subjects.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (29% in)
  • ...as soon as possible, describing to him the use and the nature of it: and the next day the waggoners arrived with it, but not in a very good condition; they had bored two holes in the brim, within an inch and half of the edge, and fastened two hooks in the holes; these hooks were tied by a long cord to the harness, and thus my hat was dragged along for above half an English mile; but, the ground in that country being extremely smooth and level, it received less damage than I expected.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (39% in)
  • Having thus fixed fifty hooks to as many cables, I went back to the north-east coast, and putting off my coat, shoes, and stockings, walked into the sea, in my leathern jerkin, about half an hour before high water.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (53% in)
  • While I was thus employed, the enemy discharged several thousand arrows, many of which stuck in my hands and face, and, beside the excessive smart, gave me much disturbance in my work.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (54% in)
  • These I took out and fastened as strongly as I could upon my nose, and thus armed, went on boldly with my work, in spite of the enemy's arrows, many of which struck against the glasses of my spectacles, but without any other effect, further than a little to discompose them.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (54% in)
  • Ingratitude is among them a capital crime, as we read it to have been in some other countries: for they reason thus; that whoever makes ill returns to his benefactor, must needs be a common enemy to the rest of mankind, from whom he has received no obligation, and therefore such a man is not fit to live.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (68% in)
  • Thus the young ladies are as much ashamed of being cowards and fools as the men, and despise all personal ornaments, beyond decency and cleanliness: neither did I perceive any difference in their education made by their difference of sex, only that the exercises of the females were not altogether so robust; and that some rules were given them relating to domestic life, and a smaller compass of learning was enjoined them: for their maxim is, that among peoples of quality, a wife should...
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (71% in)
  • This preface made me so impatient, being conscious of my own merits and innocence, that I was going to interrupt him; when he entreated me to be silent, and thus proceeded: "Out of gratitude for the favours you have done me, I procured information of the whole proceedings, and a copy of the articles; wherein I venture my head for your service.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (80% in)
  • Thus, by the great friendship of the secretary, the whole affair was compromised.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (86% in)
  • Having thus prepared all things as well as I was able, I set sail on the twenty-fourth day of September 1701, at six in the morning; and when I had gone about four-leagues to the northward, the wind being at south-east, at six in the evening I descried a small island, about half a league to the north-west.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (96% in)
  • While he was thus reasoning and resolving with himself, a sardral, or gentleman-usher, came from court, commanding my master to carry me immediately thither for the diversion of the queen and her ladies.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (27% in)
  • And thus he continued on, while my colour came and went several times, with indignation, to hear our noble country, the mistress of arts and arms, the scourge of France, the arbitress of Europe, the seat of virtue, piety, honour, and truth, the pride and envy of the world, so contemptuously treated.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (36% in)
  • ...who attended Glumdalclitch very officiously lifted me up, to place me in the boat: but I happened to slip through her fingers, and should infallibly have fallen down forty feet upon the floor, if, by the luckiest chance in the world, I had not been stopped by a corking-pin that stuck in the good gentlewoman's stomacher; the head of the pin passing between my shirt and the waistband of my breeches, and thus I was held by the middle in the air, till Glumdalclitch ran to my relief.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (56% in)
  • Yet thus much I may be allowed to say in my own vindication, that I artfully eluded many of his questions, and gave to every point a more favourable turn, by many degrees, than the strictness of truth would allow.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (74% in)
  • That the largest balls thus discharged, would not only destroy whole ranks of an army at once, but batter the strongest walls to the ground, sink down ships, with a thousand men in each, to the bottom of the sea, and when linked together by a chain, would cut through masts and rigging, divide hundreds of bodies in the middle, and lay all waste before them.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (76% in)
  • And thus, in a few days, by the help of a very faithful memory, I got some insight into their language.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (14% in)
  • And thus, by changing the situation of the stone, as often as there is occasion, the island is made to rise and fall by turns in an oblique direction, and by those alternate risings and fallings (the obliquity being not considerable) is conveyed from one part of the dominions to the other.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (26% in)
  • And thus ambassadors would be qualified to treat with foreign princes, or ministers of state, to whose tongues they were utter strangers.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (50% in)
  • Let the occiputs, thus cut off, be interchanged, applying each to the head of his opposite party-man.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (55% in)
  • For he argued thus: "that the two half brains being left to debate the matter between themselves within the space of one skull, would soon come to a good understanding, and produce that moderation, as well as regularity of thinking, so much to be wished for in the heads of those, who imagine they come into the world only to watch and govern its motion: and as to the difference of brains, in quantity or quality, among those who are directors in faction, the doctor assured us, from his...
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (55% in)
  • Thus, hope and expectation would be kept alive; none would complain of broken promises, but impute their disappointments wholly to fortune, whose shoulders are broader and stronger than those of a ministry.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (57% in)
  • Thus N, shall signify a plot; B, a regiment of horse; L, a fleet at sea; or, secondly, by transposing the letters of the alphabet in any suspected paper, they can lay open the deepest designs of a discontented party.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (59% in)
  • It may be rendered into English thus: "May your celestial majesty outlive the sun, eleven moons and a half!"
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (80% in)
  • The language of this country being always upon the flux, the struldbrugs of one age do not understand those of another; neither are they able, after two hundred years, to hold any conversation (farther than by a few general words) with their neighbours the mortals; and thus they lie under the disadvantage of living like foreigners in their own country.
    Part 3 — A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, .... (92% in)
  • While he and I were thus employed, another horse came up; who applying himself to the first in a very formal manner, they gently struck each other's right hoof before, neighing several times by turns, and varying the sound, which seemed to be almost articulate.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (6% in)
  • Upon the whole, the behaviour of these animals was so orderly and rational, so acute and judicious, that I at last concluded they must needs be magicians, who had thus metamorphosed themselves upon some design, and seeing a stranger in the way, resolved to divert themselves with him; or, perhaps, were really amazed at the sight of a man so very different in habit, feature, and complexion, from those who might probably live in so remote a climate.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (7% in)
  • Then the bay tried me with a second word, much harder to be pronounced; but reducing it to the English orthography, may be spelt thus, Houyhnhnm.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (8% in)
  • All this my master very graciously consented to; and thus the secret was kept till my clothes began to wear out, which I was forced to supply by several contrivances that shall hereafter be mentioned.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (22% in)
  • For he argued thus: "that the use of speech was to make us understand one another, and to receive information of facts; now, if any one said the thing which was not, these ends were defeated, because I cannot properly be said to understand him; and I am so far from receiving information, that he leaves me worse than in ignorance; for I am led to believe a thing black, when it is white, and short, when it is long."
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (24% in)
  • Thus they denote the folly of a servant, an omission of a child, a stone that cuts their feet, a continuance of foul or unseasonable weather, and the like, by adding to each the epithet of Yahoo.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (71% in)
  • The wind was very favourable; however, I made use at first only of my paddles; but considering I should soon be weary, and that the wind might chop about, I ventured to set up my little sail; and thus, with the help of the tide, I went at the rate of a league and a half an hour, as near as I could guess.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (82% in)
  • ] Thus, gentle reader, I have given thee a faithful history of my travels for sixteen years and above seven months: wherein I have not been so studious of ornament as of truth.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (92% in)
  • Having thus answered the only objection that can ever be raised against me as a traveller, I here take a final leave of all my courteous readers, and return to enjoy my own speculations in my little garden at Redriff; to apply those excellent lessons of virtue which I learned among the Houyhnhnms; to instruct the Yahoos of my own family, is far as I shall find them docible animals; to behold my figure often in a glass, and thus, if possible, habituate myself by time to tolerate the...
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (98% in)
  • ...in my little garden at Redriff; to apply those excellent lessons of virtue which I learned among the Houyhnhnms; to instruct the Yahoos of my own family, is far as I shall find them docible animals; to behold my figure often in a glass, and thus, if possible, habituate myself by time to tolerate the sight of a human creature; to lament the brutality to Houyhnhnms in my own country, but always treat their persons with respect, for the sake of my noble master, his family, his friends,...
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (98% in)

There are no more uses of "thus" in Gulliver's Travels.

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