toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

impudent
used in Gulliver's Travels

3 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
improperly bold or disrespectful — especially toward someone who is older or considered to be of higher status
  • After about two hours the court retired, and I was left with a strong guard, to prevent the impertinence, and probably the malice of the rabble, who were very impatient to crowd about me as near as they durst; and some of them had the impudence to shoot their arrows at me, as I sat on the ground by the door of my house, whereof one very narrowly missed my left eye.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (21% in)
  • Accordingly, they have a subaltern court paid to them by persons of the best rank; and sometimes by the force of dexterity and impudence, arrive, through several gradations, to be successors to their lord.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (46% in)
  • I have perused several books of travels with great delight in my younger days; but having since gone over most parts of the globe, and been able to contradict many fabulous accounts from my own observation, it has given me a great disgust against this part of reading, and some indignation to see the credulity of mankind so impudently abused.
    Part 4 — A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnms (93% in)

There are no more uses of "impudent" in Gulliver's Travels.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®