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ignominious
used in Gulliver's Travels

3 uses
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Definition
deserving or bringing disgrace or shame — typically in reference to behavior or character
  • The treasurer and admiral insisted that you should be put to the most painful and ignominious death, by setting fire to your house at night, and the general was to attend with twenty thousand men, armed with poisoned arrows, to shoot you on the face and hands.
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (82% in)
  • All crimes against the state, are punished here with the utmost severity; but, if the person accused makes his innocence plainly to appear upon his trial, the accuser is immediately put to an ignominious death; and out of his goods or lands the innocent person is quadruply recompensed for the loss of his time, for the danger he underwent, for the hardship of his imprisonment, and for all the charges he has been at in making his defence; or, if that fund be deficient, it is largely...
    Part 1 — A Voyage to Lilliput (64% in)
  • I had a strong hope, which never left me, that I should one day recover my liberty: and as to the ignominy of being carried about for a monster, I considered myself to be a perfect stranger in the country, and that such a misfortune could never be charged upon me as a reproach, if ever I should return to England, since the king of Great Britain himself, in my condition, must have undergone the same distress.
    Part 2 — A Voyage to Brobdingnag (21% in)

There are no more uses of "ignominious" in Gulliver's Travels.

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