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engage
used in Middlemarch

65 uses
  • It would be dishonorable to let others engage themselves to anything serious in dependence on me.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (36% in)
  • This was the Reverend Edward Casaubon, noted in the county as a man of profound learning, understood for many years to be engaged on a great work concerning religious history; also as a man of wealth enough to give lustre to his piety, and having views of his own which were to be more clearly ascertained on the publication of his book.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (4% in)
  • However, since Miss Brooke had become engaged in a conversation with Mr. Casaubon about the Vaudois clergy, Sir James betook himself to Celia, and talked to her about her sister; spoke of a house in town, and asked whether Miss Brooke disliked London.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (14% in)
  • It is right to tell you, Celia, that I am engaged to marry Mr. Casaubon.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (37% in)
  • Mr. Brooke again winced inwardly, for Dorothea's engagement had no sooner been decided, than he had thought of Mrs. Cadwallader's prospective taunts.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (42% in)
  • —this about your sister's engagement?" said Mrs. Cadwallader.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (42% in)
  • "She is engaged to marry Mr. Casaubon," said Celia, resorting, as usual, to the simplest statement of fact, and enjoying this opportunity of speaking to the Rector's wife alone.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (43% in)
  • She is engaged to be married.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (45% in)
  • Mrs. Cadwallader paused a few moments, observing the deeply hurt expression in her friend's face, which he was trying to conceal by a nervous smile, while he whipped his boot; but she soon added, "Engaged to Casaubon."
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (45% in)
  • It was wonderful to Sir James Chettam how well he continued to like going to the Grange after he had once encountered the difficulty of seeing Dorothea for the first time in the light of a woman who was engaged to another man.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (53% in)
  • Nevertheless, while Sir James said to himself that he had completely resigned her, since with the perversity of a Desdemona she had not affected a proposed match that was clearly suitable and according to nature; he could not yet be quite passive under the idea of her engagement to Mr. Casaubon.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (53% in)
  • "I suppose it is being engaged to be married that has made you think patience good," said Celia, as soon as she and Dorothea were alone together, taking off their wrappings.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (66% in)
  • Celia had become less afraid of "saying things" to Dorothea since this engagement: cleverness seemed to her more pitiable than ever.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (66% in)
  • He has certainly been drying up faster since the engagement: the flame of passion, I suppose.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (74% in)
  • He had seen Miss Vincy above his horizon almost as long as it had taken Mr. Casaubon to become engaged and married: but this learned gentleman was possessed of a fortune; he had assembled his voluminous notes, and had made that sort of reputation which precedes performance,—often the larger part of a man's fame.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (77% in)
  • But instead of reopening her engagement at the Porte Saint Martin, where she would have been all the more popular for the fatal episode, she left Paris without warning, forsaking her little court of admirers.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (29% in)
  • Again, the matter-of-course statement and tone of dismissal with which he treated what to her were the most stirring thoughts, was easily accounted for as belonging to the sense of haste and preoccupation in which she herself shared during their engagement.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (72% in)
  • Casaubon is much engaged; but you will leave your address—will you not?
    Book 2 — Old and Young (80% in)
  • Will vented those adjuring interjections which imply that admiration is too strong for syntax; and Naumann said in a tone of piteous regret— "Ah—now—if I could but have had more—but you have other engagements—I could not ask it—or even to come again to-morrow."
    Book 2 — Old and Young (90% in)
  • The Santa Clara, which was spoken of in the second place, Naumann declared himself to be dissatisfied with—he could not, in conscience, engage to make a worthy picture of it; so about the Santa Clara the arrangement was conditional.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (92% in)
  • I mean what you said about the necessity of knowing German—I mean, for the subjects that Mr. Casaubon is engaged in.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (96% in)
  • And since Mary had been keeping Mr. Featherstone's house, Mrs. Vincy's want of liking for the Garths had been converted into something more positive, by alarm lest Fred should engage himself to this plain girl, whose parents "lived in such a small way."
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (4% in)
  • Towards Fred Vincy she had a motherly feeling, and had always been disposed to excuse his errors, though she would probably not have excused Mary for engaging herself to him, her daughter being included in that more rigorous judgment which she applied to her own sex.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (17% in)
  • But I will never engage myself to one who has no manly independence, and who goes on loitering away his time on the chance that others will provide for him.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (33% in)
  • To Rosamond it seemed as if she and Lydgate were as good as engaged.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (48% in)
  • That they were some time to be engaged had long been an idea in her mind; and ideas, we know, tend to a more solid kind of existence, the necessary materials being at hand.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (48% in)
  • It is true, Lydgate had the counter-idea of remaining unengaged; but this was a mere negative, a shadow east by other resolves which themselves were capable of shrinking.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (48% in)
  • And I don't want to be married so very soon, because I think it is nice to be engaged.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (54% in)
  • While Celia was gone he walked up and down remembering what he had originally felt about Dorothea's engagement, and feeling a revival of his disgust at Mr. Brooke's indifference.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (63% in)
  • Sir James had long ceased to have any regrets on his own account: his heart was satisfied with his engagement to Celia.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (63% in)
  • But he went away without telling Dorothea what he had put into the letter, for she was engaged with her husband, and—in fact, these things were of no importance to her.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (71% in)
  • Well, people have different ways, but I understand that nobody can see Miss Vincy and Mr. Lydgate together without taking them to be engaged.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (74% in)
  • "I can hardly believe it—that you should be engaged without my knowing it—without your father's telling me."
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (74% in)
  • Here Mrs. Bulstrode's eyes finally rested on Rosamond's, who blushed deeply, and said— "I am not engaged, aunt."
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (74% in)
  • You have allowed your affections to be engaged without return.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (76% in)
  • In half an hour he left the house an engaged man, whose soul was not his own, but the woman's to whom he had bound himself.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (81% in)
  • Mr. Vincy was inclined to take a jovial view of all things that evening: he even observed to Lydgate that Fred had got the family constitution after all, and would soon be as fine a fellow as ever again; and when his approbation of Rosamond's engagement was asked for, he gave it with astonishing facility, passing at once to general remarks on the desirableness of matrimony for young men and maidens, and apparently deducing from the whole the appropriateness of a little more punch.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (81% in)
  • The Middlemarch mercer waited for an opportunity of engaging Mr. Rigg in conversation: there was no knowing how many pairs of legs the new proprietor might require hose for, and profits were more to be relied on than legacies.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (16% in)
  • Not but what I could have wished Rosamond had not engaged herself.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (20% in)
  • It's true, I wasn't at home; but Rosamond told me you hadn't a word to say against the engagement.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (20% in)
  • The sooner the engagement's off, the better.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (20% in)
  • Papa was not a rock: he had no other fixity than that fixity of alternating impulses sometimes called habit, and this was altogether unfavorable to his taking the only decisive line of conduct in relation to his daughter's engagement—namely, to inquire thoroughly into Lydgate's circumstances, declare his own inability to furnish money, and forbid alike either a speedy marriage or an engagement which must be too lengthy.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (21% in)
  • Papa was not a rock: he had no other fixity than that fixity of alternating impulses sometimes called habit, and this was altogether unfavorable to his taking the only decisive line of conduct in relation to his daughter's engagement—namely, to inquire thoroughly into Lydgate's circumstances, declare his own inability to furnish money, and forbid alike either a speedy marriage or an engagement which must be too lengthy.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (21% in)
  • The certainty that Miss Vincy and Mr. Lydgate were engaged became general in Middlemarch without the aid of formal announcement.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (23% in)
  • I am sure he did not wish for the engagement.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (23% in)
  • Any inward debate Lydgate had as to the consequences of this engagement which had stolen upon him, turned on the paucity of time rather than of money.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (25% in)
  • Lydgate had never seen her in trouble since the morning of their engagement, and he had never felt so passionately towards her as at this moment.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (27% in)
  • "I feel that papa is not quite pleased about our engagement," Rosamond continued, almost in a whisper; "and he said last night that he should certainly speak to you and say it must be given up."
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (27% in)
  • He went on:— "It is too late now for your father to say that our engagement must be given up.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (27% in)
  • You'd much better give up the engagement.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (29% in)
  • He is engaged in making scientific discoveries.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (30% in)
  • And you are going to engage Mr. Garth, who praised my cottages, Sir James says.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (62% in)
  • I considered that the strong wish you expressed to go there, when an adequate sum was furnished, was tantamount to an engagement that you would remain there for life.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (96% in)
  • "That could be supplied to you, if you would engage to keep at a distance," said Mr. Bulstrode, perhaps with a little too much eagerness in his undertone.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (96% in)
  • I cannot tell what might have been the consequences if he had not distinctly promised himself that he would go to Lowick to see Mary and tell her that he was engaged to work under her father.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (31% in)
  • He told her first of Christy's arrival and then of his own engagement with her father; and he was comforted by seeing that this latter news touched her keenly.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (40% in)
  • Mary was wondering at Fred's piqued tone, when Mr. Farebrother came in and had to hear the news about the engagement under Mr. Garth.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (41% in)
  • The horsedealer had engaged to get him a customer for his remaining good horse, for which Lydgate had determined to substitute a cheap hack, hoping by this reduction of style to get perhaps twenty pounds; and he cared now for every small sum, as a help towards feeding the patience of his tradesmen.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (34% in)
  • " 'I am immediately otherwise engaged,' she says.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (48% in)
  • He was not a man to compromise his dignity by lounging at the Green Dragon, but happening to pass along the High Street and seeing Bambridge on the other side, he took some of his long strides across to ask the horsedealer whether he had found the first-rate gig-horse which he had engaged to look for.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (83% in)
  • I don't say that Mr. Bulstrode has been guilty of shameful acts, but I call upon him either publicly to deny and confute the scandalous statements made against him by a man now dead, and who died in his house—the statement that he was for many years engaged in nefarious practices, and that he won his fortune by dishonest procedures—or else to withdraw from positions which could only have been allowed him as a gentleman among gentlemen."
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (95% in)
  • I have engaged with Mr. Bulstrode to do so.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (**% in)
  • When she reached home and remembered her engagement, she was glad of it; and finding that she had still an hour before she could dress for dinner, she walked straight to the schoolhouse and entered into a conversation with the master and mistress about the new bell, giving eager attention to their small details and repetitions, and getting up a dramatic sense that her life was very busy.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (53% in)
  • They lingered on the door-step under the steep-roofed porch, and Fred almost in a whisper said— "When we were first engaged, with the umbrella-ring, Mary, you used to—"
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (**% in)
  • On inquiry it might possibly be found that Fred and Mary still inhabit Stone Court—that the creeping plants still cast the foam of their blossoms over the fine stone-wall into the field where the walnut-trees stand in stately row—and that on sunny days the two lovers who were first engaged with the umbrella-ring may be seen in white-haired placidity at the open window from which Mary Garth, in the days of old Peter Featherstone, had often been ordered to look out for Mr. Lydgate.
    Finale (40% in)

There are no more uses of "engage" in Middlemarch.

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