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bound
used in Middlemarch

53 uses
  • They were bound to each other by a love stronger than any impulses which could have marred it.
    Finale (59% in)
  • And I do not see that I should be bound by Dorothea's opinions now we are going into society, though of course she herself ought to be bound by them.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (7% in)
  • And I do not see that I should be bound by Dorothea's opinions now we are going into society, though of course she herself ought to be bound by them.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (7% in)
  • I was bound to tell him that.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (29% in)
  • I am-therefore bound to fulfil the expectation so raised," said Mr. Casaubon, putting his conduct in the light of mere rectitude: a trait of delicacy which Dorothea noticed with admiration.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (65% in)
  • ...had made the chief part of her education, Mr. Casaubon's talk about his great book was full of new vistas; and this sense of revelation, this surprise of a nearer introduction to Stoics and Alexandrians, as people who had ideas not totally unlike her own, kept in abeyance for the time her usual eagerness for a binding theory which could bring her own life and doctrine into strict connection with that amazing past, and give the remotest sources of knowledge some bearing on her actions.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (70% in)
  • "The best in Middlemarch, I'll be bound," said Mr. Featherstone, "let the next be who she will.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (97% in)
  • And not seldom the catastrophe is bound up with the other passion, sung by the Troubadours.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (21% in)
  • It was a fatal accident—a dreadful stroke of calamity that bound me to you the more.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (30% in)
  • Whatever was not problematical and suspected about this young man—for example, a certain showiness as to foreign ideas, and a disposition to unsettle what had been settled and forgotten by his elders—was positively unwelcome to a physician whose standing had been fixed thirty years before by a treatise on Meningitis, of which at least one copy marked "own" was bound in calf.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (33% in)
  • What he really cared for was a medium for his work, a vehicle for his ideas; and after all, was he not bound to prefer the object of getting a good hospital, where he could demonstrate the specific distinctions of fever and test therapeutic results, before anything else connected with this chaplaincy?
    Book 2 — Old and Young (56% in)
  • ...was clear that Lydgate, by not dispensing drugs, intended to cast imputations on his equals, and also to obscure the limit between his own rank as a general practitioner and that of the physicians, who, in the interest of the profession, felt bound to maintain its various grades,—especially against a man who had not been to either of the English universities and enjoyed the absence of anatomical and bedside study there, but came with a libellous pretension to experience in Edinburgh...
    Book 2 — Old and Young (59% in)
  • Hence he persuaded himself that he was bound to call, and that the only eligible time was the middle of the day, when Mr. Casaubon would not be at home.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (93% in)
  • Love seeketh only self to please, To bind another to its delight, Joys in another's loss of ease, And builds a hell in heaven's despite."
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (27% in)
  • Or as if he were bound to provide charms for his posterity in his own person!
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (56% in)
  • She started up and bounded towards him in an instant: he was evidently in great straits for breath.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (61% in)
  • In half an hour he left the house an engaged man, whose soul was not his own, but the woman's to whom he had bound himself.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (81% in)
  • As manager of the household she felt bound to ask them in good provincial fashion to stay and eat; but she chose to consult Mrs. Vincy on the point of extra down-stairs consumption now that Mr. Featherstone was laid up.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (83% in)
  • If anybody had observed that Mr. Borthrop Trumbull, being an auctioneer, was bound to know the nature of everything, he would have smiled and trimmed himself silently with the sense that he came pretty near that.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (90% in)
  • "I am sure we are bound to pray for that thoughtless girl—brought up as she has been," said Mrs. Bulstrode, wishing to rouse her husband's feelings.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (24% in)
  • A man was bound to know himself better than that, and if he chose to grow gray crunching bones in a cavern, he had no business to be luring a girl into his companionship.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (36% in)
  • I do think one is bound to do the best for one's land and tenants, especially in these hard times."
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (55% in)
  • I am not bound to regard family dignity in any other light.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (65% in)
  • "But I am a rebel: I don't feel bound, as you do, to submit to what I don't like."
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (66% in)
  • How much, methinks, I could despise this man Were I not bound in charity against it!
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (89% in)
  • You have not implied to me that the symptoms which—I am bound to testify—you watched with scrupulous care, were those of a fatal disease.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (95% in)
  • But Will was Mr. Casaubon's relative, and one towards whom she was bound to show kindness.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (3% in)
  • "No, I do not yet refuse," said Dorothea, in a clear voice, the need of freedom asserting itself within her; "but it is too solemn—I think it is not right—to make a promise when I am ignorant what it will bind me to.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (47% in)
  • No; his heart was bound up in his work only: that was the end for which his failing life was to be eked out by hers.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (49% in)
  • Then she had feared lest her effort at fellowship should be unwelcome; now she dreaded going to the spot where she foresaw that she must bind herself to a fellowship from which she shrank.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (50% in)
  • Bound by a pledge given from the depths of her pity, she would have been capable of undertaking a toil which her judgment whispered was vain for all uses except that consecration of faithfulness which is a supreme use.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (62% in)
  • He had already said to Dorothea, "I don't feel bound to give up St. Botolph's.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (79% in)
  • "It is I who am bound to act so that you will not regret your power," said Mr. Farebrother.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (80% in)
  • Although I am not in any way bound to you, I am willing to supply you with a regular annuity—in quarterly payments—so long as you fulfil a promise to remain at a distance from this neighborhood.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (98% in)
  • She had a great yearning to be at Lowick, and was simply determined to go, not feeling bound to tell all her reasons.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (2% in)
  • "It war good foon, I'd be bound," said Hiram, whose fun was much restricted by circumstances.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (20% in)
  • He could not propose to Rosamond that she should return any particular present of his, but he had told himself that he was bound to put Dover's offer before her, and her inward prompting might make the affair easy.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (60% in)
  • Even without memory, the life is bound into one by a zone of dependence in growth and decay; but intense memory forces a man to own his blameworthy past.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (79% in)
  • I am ready to narrow my own resources and the prospects of my family by binding myself to allow you five hundred pounds yearly during my life, and to leave you a proportional capital at my death—nay, to do still more, if more should be definitely necessary to any laudable project on your part.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (87% in)
  • I can easily conceive that you might act in a way to loosen the tie she feels towards you—it must be remembered that she is only conditionally bound to you—and that in that case, another man, who may flatter himself that he has a hold on her regard, might succeed in winning that firm place in her love as well as respect which you had let slip.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (40% in)
  • He had told his wife that he was simply taking care of this wretched creature, the victim of vice, who might otherwise injure himself; he implied, without the direct form of falsehood, that there was a family tie which bound him to this care, and that there were signs of mental alienation in Raffles which urged caution.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (51% in)
  • I feel bound to do the utmost for him.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (65% in)
  • But I must say that your present attitude is painfully inconsistent with those principles which you have sought to identify yourself with, and for the honor of which I am bound to care.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (98% in)
  • "Surely, a woman is bound to be cautious and listen to those who know the world better than she does." said Sir James, with his little frown.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (3% in)
  • He was afraid of some betrayal in my hearing: all he wanted was to bind me to him by a strong obligation: that was why he passed on a sudden from hardness to liberality.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (5% in)
  • Mrs. Hackbutt saw her coming from an up-stairs window, and remembering her former alarm lest she should meet Mrs. Bulstrode, felt almost bound in consistency to send word that she was not at home; but against that, there was a sudden strong desire within her for the excitement of an interview in which she was quite determined not to make the slightest allusion to what was in her mind.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (15% in)
  • He was bound to try this—and what else was there for him to do?
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (27% in)
  • There are natures in which, if they love us, we are conscious of having a sort of baptism and consecration: they bind us over to rectitude and purity by their pure belief about us; and our sins become that worst kind of sacrilege which tears down the invisible altar of trust.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (41% in)
  • She forced herself to think of it as bound up with another woman's life—a woman towards whom she had set out with a longing to carry some clearness and comfort into her beclouded youth.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (57% in)
  • It was because he feels so much more about your happiness than anything else—he feels his life bound into one with yours, and it hurts him more than anything, that his misfortunes must hurt you.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (64% in)
  • What he said of you was, that he could not be happy in doing anything which made you unhappy—that his marriage was of course a bond which must affect his choice about everything; and for that reason he refused my proposal that he should keep his position at the Hospital, because that would bind him to stay in Middlemarch, and he would not undertake to do anything which would be painful to you.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (66% in)
  • How could any duty bind her to hardness?
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (77% in)
  • "I should like to do something for my brother's family, Nicholas; and I think we are bound to make some amends to Rosamond and her husband.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (94% in)

There are no more uses of "bound" in Middlemarch.

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