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tempered
used in Middlemarch

11 uses
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1  —4 uses as in:
short-tempered
Definition
having a typical mood or temperament — often in reference to how easily one is angered
  • Besides, he was a likable man: sweet-tempered, ready-witted, frank, without grins of suppressed bitterness or other conversational flavors which make half of us an affliction to our friends.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (53% in)
  • But this ill-tempered anticipation that she could desire visits which might be disagreeable to her husband, this gratuitous defence of himself against selfish complaint on her part, was too sharp a sting to be meditated on until after it had been resented.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (60% in)
  • He was not an ill-tempered man; his intellectual activity, the ardent kindness of his heart, as well as his strong frame, would always, under tolerably easy conditions, have kept him above the petty uncontrolled susceptibilities which make bad temper.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (9% in)
  • That was the state of things with Lydgate and Rosamond on the New Year's Day when they dined at her father's, she looking mildly neutral towards him in remembrance of his ill-tempered behavior at breakfast, and he carrying a much deeper effect from the inward conflict in which that morning scene was only one of many epochs.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (25% in)

There are no more uses of "tempered" flagged with this meaning in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —7 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • But my children are all good-tempered, thank God.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (4% in)
  • ...on the secondary importance of ecclesiastical forms and articles of belief compared with that spiritual religion, that submergence of self in communion with Divine perfection which seemed to her to be expressed in the best Christian books of widely distant ages, she found in Mr. Casaubon a listener who understood her at once, who could assure her of his own agreement with that view when duly tempered with wise conformity, and could mention historical examples before unknown to her.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (16% in)
  • While giving his arm, he thought that he should not himself like to be an old fellow with his constitution breaking up; and he waited good-temperedly, first before the window to hear the wonted remarks about the guinea-fowls and the weather-cock, and then before the scanty book-shelves, of which the chief glories in dark calf were Josephus, Culpepper, Klopstock's "Messiah," and several volumes of the "Gentleman's Magazine."
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (92% in)
  • Advancing womanhood had tempered her plainness, which was of a good human sort, such as the mothers of our race have very commonly worn in all latitudes under a more or less becoming headgear.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (93% in)
  • He was too filial to be disrespectful to his father, and he bore the thunder with the certainty that it was transient; but in the mean time it was disagreeable to see his mother cry, and also to be obliged to look sulky instead of having fun; for Fred was so good-tempered that if he looked glum under scolding, it was chiefly for propriety's sake.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (2% in)
  • Rosamond was silent and did not smile again; but the lovely curves of her face looked good-tempered enough without smiling.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (46% in)
  • In reality, however, she was intensely aware of Lydgate's voice and movements; and her pretty good-tempered air of unconsciousness was a studied negation by which she satisfied her inward opposition to him without compromise of propriety.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (4% in)

There are no more uses of "tempered" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®