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spontaneous
used in Middlemarch

11 uses
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Definition
behaving in an instinctive, uninhibited manner

or:

happening naturally (without planning or external force)
  • Certainly these men who had so few spontaneous ideas might be very useful members of society under good feminine direction, if they were fortunate in choosing their sisters-in-law!
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (24% in)
  • All people, young or old (that is, all people in those ante-reform times), would have thought her an interesting object if they had referred the glow in her eyes and cheeks to the newly awakened ordinary images of young love: the illusions of Chloe about Strephon have been sufficiently consecrated in poetry, as the pathetic loveliness of all spontaneous trust ought to be.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (18% in)
  • Genius, he held, is necessarily intolerant of fetters: on the one hand it must have the utmost play for its spontaneity; on the other, it may confidently await those messages from the universe which summon it to its peculiar work, only placing itself in an attitude of receptivity towards all sublime chances.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (67% in)
  • That basket held small savings from her more portable food, destined for the children of her poor friends among whom she trotted on fine mornings; fostering and petting all needy creatures being so spontaneous a delight to her, that she regarded it much as if it had been a pleasant vice that she was addicted to.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (45% in)
  • On other subjects indeed Mr. Casaubon showed a tenacity of occupation and an eagerness which are usually regarded as the effect of enthusiasm, and Dorothea was anxious to follow this spontaneous direction of his thoughts, instead of being made to feel that she dragged him away from it.
    Book 2 — Old and Young (73% in)
  • Her most cheerful supposition was that her aunt Bulstrode had interfered in some way to hinder Lydgate's visits: everything was better than a spontaneous indifference in him.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (79% in)
  • The web itself is made of spontaneous beliefs and indefinable joys, yearnings of one life towards another, visions of completeness, indefinite trust.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (22% in)
  • The thing that she liked, that she spontaneously cared to have, seemed to be always excluded from her life; for if it was only granted and not shared by her husband it might as well have been denied.
    Book 5 — The Dead Hand (44% in)
  • His belief in these moments of dread was, that if he spontaneously did something right, God would save him from the consequences of wrong-doing.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (84% in)
  • He had no longer free energy enough for spontaneous research and speculative thinking, but by the bedside of patients, the direct external calls on his judgment and sympathies brought the added impulse needed to draw him out of himself.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (31% in)
  • He began spontaneously to consider whether it would be possible to carry out that puerile notion of Rosamond's which had often made him angry, namely, that they should quit Middlemarch without seeing anything beyond that preface.
    Book 7 — Two Temptations (44% in)

There are no more uses of "spontaneous" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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