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somber
used in Middlemarch

5 uses
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Definition
serious and without cheer — perhaps even gloomy

or:

lacking brightness or color
  • The grounds here were more confined, the flower-beds showed no very careful tendance, and large clumps of trees, chiefly of sombre yews, had risen high, not ten yards from the windows.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (58% in)
  • "You will not mind this sombre light," said Dorothea, standing in the middle of the room.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (66% in)
  • The day passed in a sombre fashion, not unusual, though Mr. Casaubon was perhaps unusually silent; but there were hours of the night which might be counted on as opportunities of conversation; for Dorothea, when aware of her husband's sleeplessness, had established a habit of rising, lighting a candle, and reading him to sleep again.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (49% in)
  • It was a lovely afternoon; the leaves from the lofty limes were falling silently across the sombre evergreens, while the lights and shadows slept side by side: there was no sound but the cawing of the rooks, which to the accustomed ear is a lullaby, or that last solemn lullaby, a dirge.
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (94% in)
  • The light was more and more sombre, but there came a flash of lightning which made them start and look at each other, and then smile.
    Book 8 — Sunset and Sunrise (80% in)

There are no more uses of "somber" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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