toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

preposterous
used in Middlemarch

5 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
absurd, outrageous, silly, or completely unreasonable
  • The preposterousness of the notion that he could at once set up a satisfactory establishment as a married man was a sufficient guarantee against danger.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (43% in)
  • His fear lest Miss Brooke should have run away to join the Moravian Brethren, or some preposterous sect unknown to good society, was a little allayed by the knowledge that Mrs. Cadwallader always made the worst of things.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (44% in)
  • The human mind has at no period accepted a moral chaos; and so preposterous a result was not strictly conceivable.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (89% in)
  • Society never made the preposterous demand that a man should think as much about his own qualifications for making a charming girl happy as he thinks of hers for making himself happy.
    Book 3 — Waiting for Death (56% in)
  • He was aware that the world would regard such a sentiment as preposterous, especially in relation to a woman of one-and-twenty; the practice of "the world" being to treat of a young widow's second marriage as certain and probably near, and to smile with meaning if the widow acts accordingly.
    Book 6 — The Widow and Wife (15% in)

There are no more uses of "preposterous" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®