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pare
used in Middlemarch

2 uses
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Definition
to cut or reduce
The exact meaning of pare can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "Pare the budget." — cut it to make it smaller
  • "Pare the fat from the meat," or "Pare the apple." — cut away an outer layer or peel
  • "Use a paring knife." — a small general purpose chef's knife often used for peeling
  • "Pare the edge, so it will fit." — cut small bits or shavings from
  • "In point of fact," resumed Sir James, not choosing to dwell on "fits," "Brooke doesn't mean badly by his tenants or any one else, but he has got that way of paring and clipping at expenses."
    Book 4 — Three Love Problems (56% in)
  • Indeed, both the farmers and laborers in the parishes of Freshitt and Tipton would have felt a sad lack of conversation but for the stories about what Mrs. Cadwallader said and did: a lady of immeasurably high birth, descended, as it were, from unknown earls, dim as the crowd of heroic shades—who pleaded poverty, pared down prices, and cut jokes in the most companionable manner, though with a turn of tongue that let you know who she was.
    Book 1 — Miss Brooke (40% in)

There are no more uses of "pare" in Middlemarch.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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